2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158226
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Process of health empowerment in women-A test of a theoretical model
Abstract:
Process of health empowerment in women-A test of a theoretical model
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Shearer, Nelma
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 872602, Tempe, AZ, 85287-2602, USA
Contact Telephone:480.965.7196
A health care challenge is to optimize health and positive health behaviors in women. Historically, empowering the client has been an aspect of the nursing role. In response to the health care challenge, the nurse co-creates a plan of care with the female client. After discussing the health care plan, the client may not follow through with the plan leaving the question of "why"? The purpose of this study was to test a theoretical model of the process of health empowerment in women. The framework was based on a synthesis of Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings, life-span development "self-in-relations" theory, and Parse's simultaneity paradigm. The model proposed relationships of contextual factors (age, income, years of education, number of children, and years married) and specific interpersonal factors (social support and professional support) that was measured in terms of a sense of power as knowing participation in change and health promoting lifestyle behaviors. Empowerment was conceptualized as a human resource inherent within the woman rather than as something bestowed externally by the nurse. The sample consisted of 133 women between the ages of 21 and 45, who had children, and who visited a nurse-run Community Health Services Clinic located in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Hierarchical multiple regression technique was used to explain the influence of contextual factors and interpersonal factors on each index of health empowerment. Health empowerment was indexed using Health Promoting Lifestyle (Walker, Sechrist, & Pender, 1987) and Power as Knowing Participation in Change (Barrett, 1986) instruments. Results indicated that 43% of the variance in health promoting lifestyle behaviors was explained by education and social support. In addition, 38% of the variance in sense of power as knowing participation in change was explained by social support. The study findings did partially support the theoretical model in the finding that empowerment is an inherent process, related to the person-environment process. The findings challenge nurses to better understand women in terms of the woman's power to optimize personal health and to participate in health promotion and health-promoting behaviors. It is suggested that nurses should focus on the woman's strengths such as social support rather than only on the presenting health problems. Further study on the role of professional support in facilitating health was indicated. Better understanding of this dimension of health empowerment may optimize better use of health care services in maintaining health.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProcess of health empowerment in women-A test of a theoretical modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158226-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Process of health empowerment in women-A test of a theoretical model</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shearer, Nelma</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 872602, Tempe, AZ, 85287-2602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">480.965.7196</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nelma.shearer@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A health care challenge is to optimize health and positive health behaviors in women. Historically, empowering the client has been an aspect of the nursing role. In response to the health care challenge, the nurse co-creates a plan of care with the female client. After discussing the health care plan, the client may not follow through with the plan leaving the question of "why"? The purpose of this study was to test a theoretical model of the process of health empowerment in women. The framework was based on a synthesis of Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings, life-span development "self-in-relations" theory, and Parse's simultaneity paradigm. The model proposed relationships of contextual factors (age, income, years of education, number of children, and years married) and specific interpersonal factors (social support and professional support) that was measured in terms of a sense of power as knowing participation in change and health promoting lifestyle behaviors. Empowerment was conceptualized as a human resource inherent within the woman rather than as something bestowed externally by the nurse. The sample consisted of 133 women between the ages of 21 and 45, who had children, and who visited a nurse-run Community Health Services Clinic located in the Phoenix metropolitan area. Hierarchical multiple regression technique was used to explain the influence of contextual factors and interpersonal factors on each index of health empowerment. Health empowerment was indexed using Health Promoting Lifestyle (Walker, Sechrist, & Pender, 1987) and Power as Knowing Participation in Change (Barrett, 1986) instruments. Results indicated that 43% of the variance in health promoting lifestyle behaviors was explained by education and social support. In addition, 38% of the variance in sense of power as knowing participation in change was explained by social support. The study findings did partially support the theoretical model in the finding that empowerment is an inherent process, related to the person-environment process. The findings challenge nurses to better understand women in terms of the woman's power to optimize personal health and to participate in health promotion and health-promoting behaviors. It is suggested that nurses should focus on the woman's strengths such as social support rather than only on the presenting health problems. Further study on the role of professional support in facilitating health was indicated. Better understanding of this dimension of health empowerment may optimize better use of health care services in maintaining health.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:38:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:38:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.