Utilization and scope of practice of nurse practitioners and physician assistants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158227
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Utilization and scope of practice of nurse practitioners and physician assistants
Abstract:
Utilization and scope of practice of nurse practitioners and physician assistants
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Zulkowski, Karen, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Box 574, Billings, MT, 59101, USA
Contact Telephone:406.657.1739
Rural hospitals use nurse practitioners and physician assistants because they are cost effective, increase the variety of services offered and are required for rural health designation (Krein, 1997). However, there is confusion among health care consumers as well as health care providers as to the scope of practice and educational preparation of nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs). This descriptive study 1) compares the scope of practice and utilization practices of NPs and PAs in the state of Montana 2) explores the licensing, certification, governance and education requirements in order to distinguish the professions 3) analyzes survey findings regarding the services provided and privileges retained in their employment. The findings 1) assess the roles each professional has in the health-care industry 2) inform consumers regarding their services and credentials 3) inform professional organizations and prospective practitioners of the differences between the theoretical and actual utilization of these practitioners. From the initial review of literature, defining variables were selected as a standard for comparison. The State Medical Practice Act and the State Nurse Practice Act were reviewed for data on scope of practice and licensing requirements. State programs for higher education were consulted regarding their didactic and clinical requirements. After the theoretical details were ascertained, rural hospital administrators were queried regarding the actual utilization of these mid-level practitioners. Thirty-four hospital administrators completed the survey. Survey findings show an equilibration of the two professions in wage, benefits, services provided, privileges retained and effective scope of practice. Results based on individual practitioners show that 92.5% of PAs in Montana meet their supervision requirement by a telephone contact provision outlined by the state board of medicine. In contrast, 54.2% of NPs who are autonomous by legal definition have a telephone supervision requirement imposed on them. These findings have implications for the current and prospective professionals and the businesses for which they work. Rural hospitals are spending supervision dollars for physicians to be within telephone contact of NPs when their scope of practice and education contraindicate the need for supervision. Furthermore, NPs and their professional organizations need to consider the implications these findings have on their professional image and marketability.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUtilization and scope of practice of nurse practitioners and physician assistantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158227-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Utilization and scope of practice of nurse practitioners and physician assistants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zulkowski, Karen, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Box 574, Billings, MT, 59101, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406.657.1739</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karenz@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Rural hospitals use nurse practitioners and physician assistants because they are cost effective, increase the variety of services offered and are required for rural health designation (Krein, 1997). However, there is confusion among health care consumers as well as health care providers as to the scope of practice and educational preparation of nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs). This descriptive study 1) compares the scope of practice and utilization practices of NPs and PAs in the state of Montana 2) explores the licensing, certification, governance and education requirements in order to distinguish the professions 3) analyzes survey findings regarding the services provided and privileges retained in their employment. The findings 1) assess the roles each professional has in the health-care industry 2) inform consumers regarding their services and credentials 3) inform professional organizations and prospective practitioners of the differences between the theoretical and actual utilization of these practitioners. From the initial review of literature, defining variables were selected as a standard for comparison. The State Medical Practice Act and the State Nurse Practice Act were reviewed for data on scope of practice and licensing requirements. State programs for higher education were consulted regarding their didactic and clinical requirements. After the theoretical details were ascertained, rural hospital administrators were queried regarding the actual utilization of these mid-level practitioners. Thirty-four hospital administrators completed the survey. Survey findings show an equilibration of the two professions in wage, benefits, services provided, privileges retained and effective scope of practice. Results based on individual practitioners show that 92.5% of PAs in Montana meet their supervision requirement by a telephone contact provision outlined by the state board of medicine. In contrast, 54.2% of NPs who are autonomous by legal definition have a telephone supervision requirement imposed on them. These findings have implications for the current and prospective professionals and the businesses for which they work. Rural hospitals are spending supervision dollars for physicians to be within telephone contact of NPs when their scope of practice and education contraindicate the need for supervision. Furthermore, NPs and their professional organizations need to consider the implications these findings have on their professional image and marketability.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:38:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:38:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.