2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158228
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family centered program for mentally ill adolescents: What have we learned?
Abstract:
Family centered program for mentally ill adolescents: What have we learned?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Schepp, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Department of Psychosocial & Community Health, Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA
Contact Telephone:206.685.3213
Schizophrenia affects 1 out of 100 people in the U.S. and has a peak onset in adolescence or early adulthood. When an adolescent develops a serious psychiatric disorder such as schizophrenia, it is a devastating experience for the entire family. Schizophrenia is a chronic disorder that significantly disrupts family relationships and interferes with the adolescent's functioning at home, school and in the community. Resources are inadequate and most treatment programs are limited to medication management and brief individual counseling. Families, who carry the major burden of care, are frequently ignored or excluded from their adolescent's treatment. There is an acute need for treatment programs that address the unique needs of psychiatrically disabled adolescents and their families. The Family Centered Program for Mentally Ill Adolescents is a 5-year randomized clinical trial funded by the NIMH. The purpose of the study is to test a community-based family centered nursing intervention for adolescents with schizophrenia. The theoretical framework for the study is derived from the stress-vulnerability model of schizophrenia, stress management and symptom self-management. This framework recognizes the fundamental relationship between stress and the characteristic symptoms of schizophrenia. It also incorporates growing evidence that individuals with schizophrenia can learn to recognize and manage symptoms of their disorder. The intervention is designed to empower adolescents and their families by providing them with the knowledge, skills and support to manage their symptoms with the goal of improving both individual and family functioning. "What have we learned?" The purpose of this symposium is to share what we have learned thus far as we reach midpoint in this clinical trial. Each of the four papers in this symposium focuses on preliminary findings from a different perspective. The first paper answers the question, "Who are the families?" The preliminary findings profiling the families and issues of recruitment and retention are presented. The first paper also sets the stage for the other papers in providing more information about the study's specific aims, framework, design and treatment. The second paper answers the question, "How sick are these adolescents from the family's perspective?" In the paper, preliminary data are presented to describe how adult family members evaluate the mentally ill adolescent's level of disability and the degree to which the illness interferes with the adolescent's daily functioning. Data are compared between adults within the same family and with the clinician's evaluation of the adolescent's impairment. The adolescents' level of functioning is a major outcome variable for this study. The third paper answers the question, "How are the families doing from the their perspective?" Individual family members rate how well they see their family functioning as they cope with the experience of having a mentally ill adolescent. Preliminary findings are presented of family members' ratings on three measures of family functioning: the Family APGAR Scale, the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale-II (FACES-II), and the Family Attitude Scale (FAS). Family functioning is a major outcome variable for the study. Finally, the fourth paper answers the question, "What is it like to live with mental illness in the family?" Qualitative responses of family members are analyzed through content analysis to identify similarities and differences in the concerns of family members as they experience mental illness in the family. In summary, the preliminary findings presented in this symposium indicate we have learned a great deal at the midpoint of this study and point the way to answering the ultimate question of "How effective is this family centered program for the adolescents with the mental illness and for their families?"
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily centered program for mentally ill adolescents: What have we learned?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158228-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family centered program for mentally ill adolescents: What have we learned?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schepp, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Department of Psychosocial &amp; Community Health, Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206.685.3213</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kschepp@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Schizophrenia affects 1 out of 100 people in the U.S. and has a peak onset in adolescence or early adulthood. When an adolescent develops a serious psychiatric disorder such as schizophrenia, it is a devastating experience for the entire family. Schizophrenia is a chronic disorder that significantly disrupts family relationships and interferes with the adolescent's functioning at home, school and in the community. Resources are inadequate and most treatment programs are limited to medication management and brief individual counseling. Families, who carry the major burden of care, are frequently ignored or excluded from their adolescent's treatment. There is an acute need for treatment programs that address the unique needs of psychiatrically disabled adolescents and their families. The Family Centered Program for Mentally Ill Adolescents is a 5-year randomized clinical trial funded by the NIMH. The purpose of the study is to test a community-based family centered nursing intervention for adolescents with schizophrenia. The theoretical framework for the study is derived from the stress-vulnerability model of schizophrenia, stress management and symptom self-management. This framework recognizes the fundamental relationship between stress and the characteristic symptoms of schizophrenia. It also incorporates growing evidence that individuals with schizophrenia can learn to recognize and manage symptoms of their disorder. The intervention is designed to empower adolescents and their families by providing them with the knowledge, skills and support to manage their symptoms with the goal of improving both individual and family functioning. &quot;What have we learned?&quot; The purpose of this symposium is to share what we have learned thus far as we reach midpoint in this clinical trial. Each of the four papers in this symposium focuses on preliminary findings from a different perspective. The first paper answers the question, &quot;Who are the families?&quot; The preliminary findings profiling the families and issues of recruitment and retention are presented. The first paper also sets the stage for the other papers in providing more information about the study's specific aims, framework, design and treatment. The second paper answers the question, &quot;How sick are these adolescents from the family's perspective?&quot; In the paper, preliminary data are presented to describe how adult family members evaluate the mentally ill adolescent's level of disability and the degree to which the illness interferes with the adolescent's daily functioning. Data are compared between adults within the same family and with the clinician's evaluation of the adolescent's impairment. The adolescents' level of functioning is a major outcome variable for this study. The third paper answers the question, &quot;How are the families doing from the their perspective?&quot; Individual family members rate how well they see their family functioning as they cope with the experience of having a mentally ill adolescent. Preliminary findings are presented of family members' ratings on three measures of family functioning: the Family APGAR Scale, the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale-II (FACES-II), and the Family Attitude Scale (FAS). Family functioning is a major outcome variable for the study. Finally, the fourth paper answers the question, &quot;What is it like to live with mental illness in the family?&quot; Qualitative responses of family members are analyzed through content analysis to identify similarities and differences in the concerns of family members as they experience mental illness in the family. In summary, the preliminary findings presented in this symposium indicate we have learned a great deal at the midpoint of this study and point the way to answering the ultimate question of &quot;How effective is this family centered program for the adolescents with the mental illness and for their families?&quot;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:38:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:38:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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