2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158230
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family assessment of functioning in adolescents with schizophrenia
Abstract:
Family assessment of functioning in adolescents with schizophrenia
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Kennedy, Michael, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Research Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, PO Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA
Contact Telephone:206.685.3213
Statement of the Problem. The onset of schizophrenia in adolescence can cause significant disruption in psychological, social, and school functioning. Family members are a vital source of information in assessing changes in adolescent functioning as a result of the illness. However, individual family members may differ from each other and/or from clinicians in assessing a mentally ill adolescent's functioning. Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to examine adult family members' assessments of functioning in an adolescent with schizophrenia. Data from individual family members are compared with each other and with clinician assessment of the adolescent's functioning. Sample. The sample consists of 34 adult members of families who have an adolescent with schizophrenia. Each family selected a Designated Family Respondent (DFR) for the purposes of data collection, although all family members were encouraged to participate in data collection. The age of respondents ranged from 30 to 78 years with a mean of 48 years. Sixty percent of adult family members were female (n = 20) and 40% male (n = 14). However, 75% of the designated family respondents were female (n = 12) and only 25% were male (n = 4). The majority of the adult family members were biological parents (n = 20), followed by adoptive or step-parents (n = 5), other relatives (n = 5) and grandparents (n = 3). Only one adult respondent was listed as a non-relative. Other demographic characteristics of the sample are described in the previous paper. Methods. Each adult participant was asked to: 1) determine the amount of disability (0% - 100%) the adolescent is experiencing now as a result of the illness; and 2) estimate the number of days the adolescent's symptoms interfered with her/his normal activity in the past 6 months (0 - 180 days). Clinician ratings were obtained by a Psychiatric-Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist using the Child/Adolescent Version of the Global Assessment Scale (K-GAS; Schaffer et al., 1983). The K-GAS measures psychological, social, and school functioning on a hypothetical continuum from 1 (danger to self or others; inability to function) to 9 (good functioning in all areas). A mid-score of 5 indicates serious impairment in social, occupational, or school functioning. Findings. Individual ratings of adolescent disability ranged from 5% to 100%, with a mean of 67%. Ratings of interference with daily activities ranged from 0 to 180 days, with a mean of 89 days. K-GAS scores ranged from 2 (danger to self or others) to 5 (serious impairment), with a mean of 3.4 (major impairment/inability to function in some areas). Comparison of individual ratings within families revealed wide variability in a few cases, as well as inconsistency between disability and interference scores. In the majority of cases, family ratings of adolescent functioning were comparable to clinician ratings on the K-GAS. The implications of these findings for research and practice with families who have a mentally ill adolescent will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily assessment of functioning in adolescents with schizophreniaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158230-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family assessment of functioning in adolescents with schizophrenia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kennedy, Michael, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, PO Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206.685.3213</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkennedy@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statement of the Problem. The onset of schizophrenia in adolescence can cause significant disruption in psychological, social, and school functioning. Family members are a vital source of information in assessing changes in adolescent functioning as a result of the illness. However, individual family members may differ from each other and/or from clinicians in assessing a mentally ill adolescent's functioning. Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to examine adult family members' assessments of functioning in an adolescent with schizophrenia. Data from individual family members are compared with each other and with clinician assessment of the adolescent's functioning. Sample. The sample consists of 34 adult members of families who have an adolescent with schizophrenia. Each family selected a Designated Family Respondent (DFR) for the purposes of data collection, although all family members were encouraged to participate in data collection. The age of respondents ranged from 30 to 78 years with a mean of 48 years. Sixty percent of adult family members were female (n = 20) and 40% male (n = 14). However, 75% of the designated family respondents were female (n = 12) and only 25% were male (n = 4). The majority of the adult family members were biological parents (n = 20), followed by adoptive or step-parents (n = 5), other relatives (n = 5) and grandparents (n = 3). Only one adult respondent was listed as a non-relative. Other demographic characteristics of the sample are described in the previous paper. Methods. Each adult participant was asked to: 1) determine the amount of disability (0% - 100%) the adolescent is experiencing now as a result of the illness; and 2) estimate the number of days the adolescent's symptoms interfered with her/his normal activity in the past 6 months (0 - 180 days). Clinician ratings were obtained by a Psychiatric-Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist using the Child/Adolescent Version of the Global Assessment Scale (K-GAS; Schaffer et al., 1983). The K-GAS measures psychological, social, and school functioning on a hypothetical continuum from 1 (danger to self or others; inability to function) to 9 (good functioning in all areas). A mid-score of 5 indicates serious impairment in social, occupational, or school functioning. Findings. Individual ratings of adolescent disability ranged from 5% to 100%, with a mean of 67%. Ratings of interference with daily activities ranged from 0 to 180 days, with a mean of 89 days. K-GAS scores ranged from 2 (danger to self or others) to 5 (serious impairment), with a mean of 3.4 (major impairment/inability to function in some areas). Comparison of individual ratings within families revealed wide variability in a few cases, as well as inconsistency between disability and interference scores. In the majority of cases, family ratings of adolescent functioning were comparable to clinician ratings on the K-GAS. The implications of these findings for research and practice with families who have a mentally ill adolescent will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:38:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:38:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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