2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158231
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living with mental illness: Family members perceptions
Abstract:
Living with mental illness: Family members perceptions
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Kim, Hyun
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Contact Address:School of Nursing, PO Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA
Contact Telephone:206.685.0811
Living with an adolescent with schizophrenia is a huge burden for a family. Family members including parents, siblings, and other relatives experience the ups and downs of illness together through its progress. These experiences with the illness are devastating and often give family members feelings such as " (it is) worse than having him dead. This MI will go on forever or until he kills me or himself." Family Centered Program for Adolescents with Schizophrenia is designed to help these families with adolescents with the illness through an intervention, which has emphasis on social support, symptom management, stress management, and coping skills. The objectives of this paper are: 1) to identify major concerns of the family members to the impact of the illness on the family and their perception of the illness, 2) to describe main responses of adolescents with the illness, 3) to examine changes in family members after the intervention from a longitudinal perspective, by analyzing comments from family members who participated in the Program. Five questions were asked and responses from the family members were reviewed using content analysis. The preliminary results are from 65 family members on the impact of the illness on the family and their perceptions of their level of family functioning, management of the illness, and knowledge of the illness. From the powerful descriptions of the lived experiences of the family members, four major concerns of the family members include: 1) emotional response (e.g. "It's terrible. Devastating", "It is a extremely destructive experience on the family", "scare, worry, sympathy, exhausted"), 2) looking for hopes and support (" hopes and prayers that a cure can be found for his illness", "...will there ever be a cure for it?", "I would like to know more about people with mental illness who are successful and more about support services."), 3) worries about the future of the teens (e.g. " I worry about his medications; his future; and his ability to get along with other people", " How he will get a job...", "the future", "the future-what job will he be able to do to have a constructive life"), 4) lack of knowledge of the illness (e.g. "Like to know everything", "How this illness strikes so suddenly...", "I would like to know more about his illness."). Adolescents with the illness show two main responses, which are: 1) emotional responses (e.g. "I felt bad when I was sick at first", "very bad", "frustrating"), 2) denial (e.g. "I am not convinced I have it. It bugs me mildly that people now think of me as mentally ill", "I deny it and I believe that I don't have it", "I don't have an illness."). Preliminary findings also show that some family members demonstrate changes in their attitudes toward adolescents with the illness and find stress management techniques from the intervention actually help them deal with their stress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving with mental illness: Family members perceptionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158231-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Living with mental illness: Family members perceptions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kim, Hyun</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, PO Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206.685.0811</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eunjw@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Living with an adolescent with schizophrenia is a huge burden for a family. Family members including parents, siblings, and other relatives experience the ups and downs of illness together through its progress. These experiences with the illness are devastating and often give family members feelings such as &quot; (it is) worse than having him dead. This MI will go on forever or until he kills me or himself.&quot; Family Centered Program for Adolescents with Schizophrenia is designed to help these families with adolescents with the illness through an intervention, which has emphasis on social support, symptom management, stress management, and coping skills. The objectives of this paper are: 1) to identify major concerns of the family members to the impact of the illness on the family and their perception of the illness, 2) to describe main responses of adolescents with the illness, 3) to examine changes in family members after the intervention from a longitudinal perspective, by analyzing comments from family members who participated in the Program. Five questions were asked and responses from the family members were reviewed using content analysis. The preliminary results are from 65 family members on the impact of the illness on the family and their perceptions of their level of family functioning, management of the illness, and knowledge of the illness. From the powerful descriptions of the lived experiences of the family members, four major concerns of the family members include: 1) emotional response (e.g. &quot;It's terrible. Devastating&quot;, &quot;It is a extremely destructive experience on the family&quot;, &quot;scare, worry, sympathy, exhausted&quot;), 2) looking for hopes and support (&quot; hopes and prayers that a cure can be found for his illness&quot;, &quot;...will there ever be a cure for it?&quot;, &quot;I would like to know more about people with mental illness who are successful and more about support services.&quot;), 3) worries about the future of the teens (e.g. &quot; I worry about his medications; his future; and his ability to get along with other people&quot;, &quot; How he will get a job...&quot;, &quot;the future&quot;, &quot;the future-what job will he be able to do to have a constructive life&quot;), 4) lack of knowledge of the illness (e.g. &quot;Like to know everything&quot;, &quot;How this illness strikes so suddenly...&quot;, &quot;I would like to know more about his illness.&quot;). Adolescents with the illness show two main responses, which are: 1) emotional responses (e.g. &quot;I felt bad when I was sick at first&quot;, &quot;very bad&quot;, &quot;frustrating&quot;), 2) denial (e.g. &quot;I am not convinced I have it. It bugs me mildly that people now think of me as mentally ill&quot;, &quot;I deny it and I believe that I don't have it&quot;, &quot;I don't have an illness.&quot;). Preliminary findings also show that some family members demonstrate changes in their attitudes toward adolescents with the illness and find stress management techniques from the intervention actually help them deal with their stress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:38:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:38:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.