2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158232
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social support, reciprocity, and conflict in homeless and never-homeless women
Abstract:
Social support, reciprocity, and conflict in homeless and never-homeless women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Anderson, Debra, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 315 HSLC, Lexington, KY, 40536-0232, USA
Contact Telephone:859.257.3410
Rationale/Background: Homelessness is a complex problem facing health and social systems worldwide. Women, as heads of families, comprise the fastest growing group of homeless persons in the United States. The contributing factors for homelessness facing women in the United States, including violence, poverty, mental illness, drug abuse, and lack of support systems are faced by women throughout the world. Specific Aims/Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare women who have experienced homelessness to those who have not experienced homelessness. The specific aims were to: 1) Compare current and childhood social support, reciprocity, and conflict; 2) Compare childhood experiences of intimacy and autonomy in families of origin; and 3) Examine the relationship between intimacy and autonomy in families of origin and childhood social support networks. Methods: A descriptive correlational design was used. Homeless (n = 94) and never-homeless (n = 88) women were interviewed. The questionnaires (Interpersonal Relationship Inventory, Interpersonal Relationship Inventory - Adapted, and Family of Origin Scale) measured social support, reciprocity, conflict, autonomy and intimacy. Analysis: T-tests were used to assess the magnitude of differences between women who had and women who had not experienced homelessness on all variables. Using the Bonferroni correction, a significance level of p = .01 was regarded as statistically significant. Findings: Significant differences were found between the two groups regarding current social support (t = -4.5, p < .001); reciprocity (t = -2.5, p < .01); and a trend toward significance regarding conflict (t = 2.5, p < .05). No significant differences were found between the two groups regarding autonomy and intimacy. No significant differences were found between the two groups regarding social support networks of their childhood. Implications and Significance: Recommendations for long-term interventions for women and girls include development of positive support networks, early identification of risk factors, relationship building, violence prevention, positive female role modeling and policy development at local, state and national levels.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial support, reciprocity, and conflict in homeless and never-homeless womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158232-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social support, reciprocity, and conflict in homeless and never-homeless women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Debra, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 315 HSLC, Lexington, KY, 40536-0232, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">859.257.3410</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">danders@pop.uky.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Rationale/Background: Homelessness is a complex problem facing health and social systems worldwide. Women, as heads of families, comprise the fastest growing group of homeless persons in the United States. The contributing factors for homelessness facing women in the United States, including violence, poverty, mental illness, drug abuse, and lack of support systems are faced by women throughout the world. Specific Aims/Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare women who have experienced homelessness to those who have not experienced homelessness. The specific aims were to: 1) Compare current and childhood social support, reciprocity, and conflict; 2) Compare childhood experiences of intimacy and autonomy in families of origin; and 3) Examine the relationship between intimacy and autonomy in families of origin and childhood social support networks. Methods: A descriptive correlational design was used. Homeless (n = 94) and never-homeless (n = 88) women were interviewed. The questionnaires (Interpersonal Relationship Inventory, Interpersonal Relationship Inventory - Adapted, and Family of Origin Scale) measured social support, reciprocity, conflict, autonomy and intimacy. Analysis: T-tests were used to assess the magnitude of differences between women who had and women who had not experienced homelessness on all variables. Using the Bonferroni correction, a significance level of p = .01 was regarded as statistically significant. Findings: Significant differences were found between the two groups regarding current social support (t = -4.5, p &lt; .001); reciprocity (t = -2.5, p &lt; .01); and a trend toward significance regarding conflict (t = 2.5, p &lt; .05). No significant differences were found between the two groups regarding autonomy and intimacy. No significant differences were found between the two groups regarding social support networks of their childhood. Implications and Significance: Recommendations for long-term interventions for women and girls include development of positive support networks, early identification of risk factors, relationship building, violence prevention, positive female role modeling and policy development at local, state and national levels.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:38:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:38:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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