2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158233
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hospice Nursing: The Specialty
Abstract:
Hospice Nursing: The Specialty
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Wright, Dolores
P.I. Institution Name:Loma Linda University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, West Hall, Loma Linda, CA, 92350, USA
Contact Telephone:909.558.1000
The purpose of this study was to identify and delineate what experienced hospice nurses perceive as the knowledge and skills base essential to their practice of hospice nursing as a specialty. Little of this specialty is taught in basic nursing programs, so another purpose was to determine the methods hospice nurses use for knowledge and skills acquisition. The qualitative study method of focused ethnography was used. This method allowed the researcher to examine hospice nurses in the context of their own community-based agency, inter the research arena with specific question, describe the topic from the viewpoint of the participants, use multiple data sources, and begin data analysis concurrently with data collection, which continued until saturation was reached. During data analysis, 11 categories emerged. Four of these categories involved skills: (a) assessment skills, (b) communication skills, (c) technical skills, and (d) management skills; and seven categories primarily involved knowledge: (a) end-stage disease process, (b) signs of impending death, (c) palliative therapeutics, (d) collaboration between disciplines, (e) advocacy, (f) philosophy and ethics of hospice care, and (g) family dynamics. Of these 11 categories, the one discussed and observed most often was that of assessment skills. It was found that the hospice nurses learned their specialty by doing it. However, the need for graduate education in hospice nursing became exceedingly apparent.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHospice Nursing: The Specialtyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158233-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hospice Nursing: The Specialty</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wright, Dolores</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loma Linda University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, West Hall, Loma Linda, CA, 92350, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">909.558.1000</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">djwright@sn.llu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to identify and delineate what experienced hospice nurses perceive as the knowledge and skills base essential to their practice of hospice nursing as a specialty. Little of this specialty is taught in basic nursing programs, so another purpose was to determine the methods hospice nurses use for knowledge and skills acquisition. The qualitative study method of focused ethnography was used. This method allowed the researcher to examine hospice nurses in the context of their own community-based agency, inter the research arena with specific question, describe the topic from the viewpoint of the participants, use multiple data sources, and begin data analysis concurrently with data collection, which continued until saturation was reached. During data analysis, 11 categories emerged. Four of these categories involved skills: (a) assessment skills, (b) communication skills, (c) technical skills, and (d) management skills; and seven categories primarily involved knowledge: (a) end-stage disease process, (b) signs of impending death, (c) palliative therapeutics, (d) collaboration between disciplines, (e) advocacy, (f) philosophy and ethics of hospice care, and (g) family dynamics. Of these 11 categories, the one discussed and observed most often was that of assessment skills. It was found that the hospice nurses learned their specialty by doing it. However, the need for graduate education in hospice nursing became exceedingly apparent.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:38:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:38:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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