2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158236
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relating numeric ratings, physical sensations, and affective perceptions
Abstract:
Relating numeric ratings, physical sensations, and affective perceptions
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Meek, Paula, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1305 North Martin Street, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA
Contact Telephone:520.626.3233
Specific Aims: The purpose of this study was to examine and describe the relationship of self-reported numeric rating thresholds for seeking care, and self-reported physical sensations and affective perceptions of breathing symptoms across healthy individuals and those with stable COPD and asthma. Rationale and Background: Breathing symptoms include physical sensations and affective perceptions that can change with each breath. Frequently clinicians ask people to describe breathing symptoms using numeric ratings, on a scale of one to ten (1-10 worse), as they relate to seeking help. Earlier studies have suggested that there is little change in numeric ratings over time, however, it is uncertain how numeric ratings relate to physical sensation and affective perception indices of breathing. Understanding these relationships may help clinicians predict numeric ranking of breathing symptoms from an individual perspective. This study asks what is the relationship between the numeric ratings individuals use for help-seeking and measures of peak expiratory flow, breathing distress and effort, anxiety, irritability, poor memory, and helplessness. Methods: Design: An exploratory secondary analysis was done on data from a longitudinal pilot study designed to understand the symptom of dyspnea. Sample: The study included healthy individuals (9M/6F) who had no history of pulmonary disease and exercised 2-3x week; individuals with COPD (8M/4F) who had moderate to severe (FEV1 50 ±19%) impairment, and individuals with asthma (6M/9F) who met the NHLBI criteria for moderate disease. Measurement: Subjects completed daily measures of peak expiratory flow (PEF) and breathing distress and effort using a visual analog scale (VAS). Weekly measures of the numeric rating that best described the point at which they would seek care for breathing symptoms were collected. Selected sub-scale measures of the Bronchitis Emphysema Symptom Checklist ([BESC], Kinsman) related to anxiety, irritability, poor memory, and helplessness were also gathered. Analyses: Mean, minimum, maximum, standard deviation, and variance for all of the physical and affective measures were calculated over the four-week period. Mean numeric ratings were calculated for each subject. Preliminary correlation analyses revealed significant negative relationships (above r = -.371) between ratings and all PEF mean, minimum, and maximum measures; and positive relationships (above r = .317) with the BESC sub-scales for anxiety and helplessness. Regression was used to determine to what extent combinations of these variables explained the variance in the numeric ratings across groups. Only PEF minimum remained in the model, accounting for 15.1% (B= -.419) of the variance of numeric ratings across all groups. Conclusion: Several statistically significant relationships do exist between numeric ratings and selected physical and affective indices of breathing symptoms when examined across groups of healthy, COPD, and asthma individuals, however, only one variable (PEF minimum) explained any of the variance. The results suggest that numeric rating, as a help-seeking indicator, may be somewhat predicted by PEF minimum measures. An interesting finding was that self-reported distress and effort related to breathing during the week prior to assigning a numeric rating had no impact on the results.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelating numeric ratings, physical sensations, and affective perceptionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158236-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relating numeric ratings, physical sensations, and affective perceptions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Meek, Paula, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1305 North Martin Street, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520.626.3233</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pmeek@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Specific Aims: The purpose of this study was to examine and describe the relationship of self-reported numeric rating thresholds for seeking care, and self-reported physical sensations and affective perceptions of breathing symptoms across healthy individuals and those with stable COPD and asthma. Rationale and Background: Breathing symptoms include physical sensations and affective perceptions that can change with each breath. Frequently clinicians ask people to describe breathing symptoms using numeric ratings, on a scale of one to ten (1-10 worse), as they relate to seeking help. Earlier studies have suggested that there is little change in numeric ratings over time, however, it is uncertain how numeric ratings relate to physical sensation and affective perception indices of breathing. Understanding these relationships may help clinicians predict numeric ranking of breathing symptoms from an individual perspective. This study asks what is the relationship between the numeric ratings individuals use for help-seeking and measures of peak expiratory flow, breathing distress and effort, anxiety, irritability, poor memory, and helplessness. Methods: Design: An exploratory secondary analysis was done on data from a longitudinal pilot study designed to understand the symptom of dyspnea. Sample: The study included healthy individuals (9M/6F) who had no history of pulmonary disease and exercised 2-3x week; individuals with COPD (8M/4F) who had moderate to severe (FEV1 50 &plusmn;19%) impairment, and individuals with asthma (6M/9F) who met the NHLBI criteria for moderate disease. Measurement: Subjects completed daily measures of peak expiratory flow (PEF) and breathing distress and effort using a visual analog scale (VAS). Weekly measures of the numeric rating that best described the point at which they would seek care for breathing symptoms were collected. Selected sub-scale measures of the Bronchitis Emphysema Symptom Checklist ([BESC], Kinsman) related to anxiety, irritability, poor memory, and helplessness were also gathered. Analyses: Mean, minimum, maximum, standard deviation, and variance for all of the physical and affective measures were calculated over the four-week period. Mean numeric ratings were calculated for each subject. Preliminary correlation analyses revealed significant negative relationships (above r = -.371) between ratings and all PEF mean, minimum, and maximum measures; and positive relationships (above r = .317) with the BESC sub-scales for anxiety and helplessness. Regression was used to determine to what extent combinations of these variables explained the variance in the numeric ratings across groups. Only PEF minimum remained in the model, accounting for 15.1% (B= -.419) of the variance of numeric ratings across all groups. Conclusion: Several statistically significant relationships do exist between numeric ratings and selected physical and affective indices of breathing symptoms when examined across groups of healthy, COPD, and asthma individuals, however, only one variable (PEF minimum) explained any of the variance. The results suggest that numeric rating, as a help-seeking indicator, may be somewhat predicted by PEF minimum measures. An interesting finding was that self-reported distress and effort related to breathing during the week prior to assigning a numeric rating had no impact on the results.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:38:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:38:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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