2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158238
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Language Used in Episodes of Breathing Distress and Effort
Abstract:
Language Used in Episodes of Breathing Distress and Effort
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Meek, Paula, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1305 North Martin Street, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA
Contact Telephone:520.626.3233
Specific Aims: Language serves as a tool for patients to communicate their subjective experience for assessment and treatment. This small study offers an initial report of real-time, non-cued languaging of breathlessness. Specifically, this study examined the words and phrases used to describe the distress and effort of breathing events in daily living. Rationale and Background: The physical effort associated with breathing is not always directly linked with the associated distress. The breathing distress and effort associated with exercise has been found to be related but different in healthy individuals (Wilson & Jones, 1991). The language used to describe breathing changes (Simon, et al. 1989, 1991) has been examined in healthy individuals and those with chronic pulmonary diseases. However little information exists about the language used to describe real-time events, particularly when a mismatch exists between the perception of distress and effort. Methods: Sample: Thirteen individuals with stable COPD (8M/5F) age 68.3 ± 10.3 (FEV1 1.24 ±.52 L., 48.8 ±18%, FEV1/FVC 52.6 ± 13%) recorded their level of distress and effort over 28 days on visual analogue scales. Design: Daily journals asking individual's to recorded details of any breathless episode, including thoughts and emotions, were also kept during this period. Descriptive statistics and in-depth content analysis of the language used in the journal to describe an episode (distress or effort over 20 cm above the individual's 28 day mean) were conducted. All participants reported more than one, with 72 total events out of a possible 359 recorded. Of the 72 events most (55%) were matched for distress and effort, with only 45% (n=32) representing a mismatch for one or the other. A mismatch occurred when either distress or effort score was elevated without concomitant elevation in the other term. Analysis: Daily journals revealed several factors that influenced matching. One factor, was the nature of the event in terms of familiarity and action required for breathlessness control. For example, one individual with 100% mismatch, identified effort for 3 events associated with physical or breathing exercises requiring only rest for return to normal breathing and 1distress event that was totally unexpected and required inhaler use. Also an individual's sensitivity to discern breathing changes, as distinct bodily changes were factors identified in the journals that influenced the match between distress and effort. Factors associated with mismatch included familiarity with the event and action required for resolution seemed customary. Tightness and work were the most common real-time, non-cued words we found in this analysis. We also found, however, that the most commonly used word "work" was used holistically, rather than solely focused on breathing. Conclusion: The results of this investigation revealed that approximately half of the events had matching levels of distress and effort. Mismatches were seen more commonly with distress and appear linked to the individual's familiarity with the situation and sensitivity to bodily changes. Further analysis of real-time events, both matched and mismatched breathing distress and effort, is need to better understand languaging and self-management.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLanguage Used in Episodes of Breathing Distress and Efforten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158238-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Language Used in Episodes of Breathing Distress and Effort</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Meek, Paula, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1305 North Martin Street, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85721-0203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520.626.3233</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pmeek@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Specific Aims: Language serves as a tool for patients to communicate their subjective experience for assessment and treatment. This small study offers an initial report of real-time, non-cued languaging of breathlessness. Specifically, this study examined the words and phrases used to describe the distress and effort of breathing events in daily living. Rationale and Background: The physical effort associated with breathing is not always directly linked with the associated distress. The breathing distress and effort associated with exercise has been found to be related but different in healthy individuals (Wilson &amp; Jones, 1991). The language used to describe breathing changes (Simon, et al. 1989, 1991) has been examined in healthy individuals and those with chronic pulmonary diseases. However little information exists about the language used to describe real-time events, particularly when a mismatch exists between the perception of distress and effort. Methods: Sample: Thirteen individuals with stable COPD (8M/5F) age 68.3 &plusmn; 10.3 (FEV1 1.24 &plusmn;.52 L., 48.8 &plusmn;18%, FEV1/FVC 52.6 &plusmn; 13%) recorded their level of distress and effort over 28 days on visual analogue scales. Design: Daily journals asking individual's to recorded details of any breathless episode, including thoughts and emotions, were also kept during this period. Descriptive statistics and in-depth content analysis of the language used in the journal to describe an episode (distress or effort over 20 cm above the individual's 28 day mean) were conducted. All participants reported more than one, with 72 total events out of a possible 359 recorded. Of the 72 events most (55%) were matched for distress and effort, with only 45% (n=32) representing a mismatch for one or the other. A mismatch occurred when either distress or effort score was elevated without concomitant elevation in the other term. Analysis: Daily journals revealed several factors that influenced matching. One factor, was the nature of the event in terms of familiarity and action required for breathlessness control. For example, one individual with 100% mismatch, identified effort for 3 events associated with physical or breathing exercises requiring only rest for return to normal breathing and 1distress event that was totally unexpected and required inhaler use. Also an individual's sensitivity to discern breathing changes, as distinct bodily changes were factors identified in the journals that influenced the match between distress and effort. Factors associated with mismatch included familiarity with the event and action required for resolution seemed customary. Tightness and work were the most common real-time, non-cued words we found in this analysis. We also found, however, that the most commonly used word &quot;work&quot; was used holistically, rather than solely focused on breathing. Conclusion: The results of this investigation revealed that approximately half of the events had matching levels of distress and effort. Mismatches were seen more commonly with distress and appear linked to the individual's familiarity with the situation and sensitivity to bodily changes. Further analysis of real-time events, both matched and mismatched breathing distress and effort, is need to better understand languaging and self-management.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:38:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:38:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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