2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158239
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dyspnea Self-Management; Self-Efficacy, Mastery, and Dyspnea Severity
Abstract:
Dyspnea Self-Management; Self-Efficacy, Mastery, and Dyspnea Severity
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Tsang, Amy
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1305 North Martin Street, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85719-0203, USA
Contact Telephone:520.626.4544
Specific Aims: This paper examines the relationship between self-efficacy (SE) for managing dyspnea, mastery, and dyspnea severity for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Rationale/Background: Dyspnea is the most common and debilitating symptom for patients with COPD. Instructing patients about self-management strategies appear to enhance patient's self-efficacy, a belief in one's capabilities to control, organize and execute action required to obtain certain outcomes, for managing dyspnea. However, the relationship among SE for managing dyspnea, mastery, and dyspnea severity is not clear. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial, which examined the effect of three treatments on SE in patients with COPD. Since changes in SE did not differ among the three groups, they were combined for this analysis. Sample. 102 subjects, 57 women and 45 men, with moderate to severe COPD, experiencing dyspnea with daily activities, were included. The mean FEV1 in liters was 1.09 (0.33L and the FEV1 % predicted was 45 (14%. The mean age was 66 (8. Measurement. SE for managing dyspnea was measured with three instruments, the COPD SE Scale (CSES), the Stanford SE for Managing Shortness of Breath Question (SEMSOB), and the SE and Dyspnea Strategies Confidence Subscale (SEADS-C). Mastery was measured with the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire's mastery sub-scale (CRQ-M). Dyspnea severity was measured with questions modified from the Medical Outcome Study Short Form (SF-36) [SOB severity and SOB Interference], dyspnea reported at the end of the six-minute walk (6MW SOB), and the CRQ Dyspnea sub-scale (CRQ-D). Analysis. Pearson correlation analyses were performed among the measures at baseline and post-treatment. Results: All three measures were significantly related to mastery at baseline and post-treatment (r=.34 to .63; p<.001). None of the three measures was significantly related to 6MW SOB at baseline or post-treatment. SEMSOB was significantly related to SF-36 SOB (r=-.25 to -.30; p<.05 to .01), SF-36 Interference (-.32 to -.35; p<.01to .001), and CRQ-D (.34 to .39; p<.01). Conclusions and implications: SE for managing dyspnea was related to perceived control of the illness, self-reported dyspnea severity, and perceived SOB interference with daily lives. It appears that SE for managing dyspnea is a reflection of general dyspnea severity and not patients' present level of dyspnea, such as SOB reported after exercise.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDyspnea Self-Management; Self-Efficacy, Mastery, and Dyspnea Severityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158239-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dyspnea Self-Management; Self-Efficacy, Mastery, and Dyspnea Severity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tsang, Amy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1305 North Martin Street, PO Box 210203, Tucson, AZ, 85719-0203, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">520.626.4544</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">atsang@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Specific Aims: This paper examines the relationship between self-efficacy (SE) for managing dyspnea, mastery, and dyspnea severity for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Rationale/Background: Dyspnea is the most common and debilitating symptom for patients with COPD. Instructing patients about self-management strategies appear to enhance patient's self-efficacy, a belief in one's capabilities to control, organize and execute action required to obtain certain outcomes, for managing dyspnea. However, the relationship among SE for managing dyspnea, mastery, and dyspnea severity is not clear. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial, which examined the effect of three treatments on SE in patients with COPD. Since changes in SE did not differ among the three groups, they were combined for this analysis. Sample. 102 subjects, 57 women and 45 men, with moderate to severe COPD, experiencing dyspnea with daily activities, were included. The mean FEV1 in liters was 1.09 (0.33L and the FEV1 % predicted was 45 (14%. The mean age was 66 (8. Measurement. SE for managing dyspnea was measured with three instruments, the COPD SE Scale (CSES), the Stanford SE for Managing Shortness of Breath Question (SEMSOB), and the SE and Dyspnea Strategies Confidence Subscale (SEADS-C). Mastery was measured with the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire's mastery sub-scale (CRQ-M). Dyspnea severity was measured with questions modified from the Medical Outcome Study Short Form (SF-36) [SOB severity and SOB Interference], dyspnea reported at the end of the six-minute walk (6MW SOB), and the CRQ Dyspnea sub-scale (CRQ-D). Analysis. Pearson correlation analyses were performed among the measures at baseline and post-treatment. Results: All three measures were significantly related to mastery at baseline and post-treatment (r=.34 to .63; p&lt;.001). None of the three measures was significantly related to 6MW SOB at baseline or post-treatment. SEMSOB was significantly related to SF-36 SOB (r=-.25 to -.30; p&lt;.05 to .01), SF-36 Interference (-.32 to -.35; p&lt;.01to .001), and CRQ-D (.34 to .39; p&lt;.01). Conclusions and implications: SE for managing dyspnea was related to perceived control of the illness, self-reported dyspnea severity, and perceived SOB interference with daily lives. It appears that SE for managing dyspnea is a reflection of general dyspnea severity and not patients' present level of dyspnea, such as SOB reported after exercise.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:38:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:38:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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