2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158241
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Apnea and periodic breathing during bottle feeding of premature infants
Abstract:
Apnea and periodic breathing during bottle feeding of premature infants
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:McGrath, Jacqueline, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 873008, Tempe, AZ, 85287-3008, USA
Contact Telephone:480.727.7380
Statement of the Problem: Low birth weight preterm infants are often noted to have increased periodic breathing and apneic events with the introduction of oral nipple-feeding. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the progression of rhythmic breathing (ventilation stability) with oral nipple feeding during the advancement from the initiation of oral nipple feeding to attainment of full nipple feeding in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Infants who participated in this research were also members of a larger NIH-NINR study. Design & Methods: Low birth weight preterm infants were followed with a weekly feeding protocol from the initiation of oral feeding through discharge from the NICU. Physiologic variables were collected with sucking variables during the first five minutes of a routine feeding with the Krons Nutritive Sucking Apparatus. The sample consisted of 68 preterm infants who were noted to have periodic breathing during initial data collection. These infants were followed to study the progression and maturation of ventilation stability with nipple feeding. Infants were studied in the NICU and until 44 weeks post-conceptual age in follow-up. Results: Preterm infants who participated in this projected were noted to demonstrate significantly increased apnea and periodic breathing during feeding (p= .04) as compared to times when not feeding that decreased over time. Maturation not experience appeared to be more correlated with this progression. Increases in ventilation stability were correlated with increasing post conceptional age. Restricted flow appeared to decrease both apnea and periodic breathing with feeding. In addition, feeding that was more infant directed appeared to decrease these diminished ventilation events. Implications: Apnea and Periodic breathing during feeding appear to be factors that are highly correlated with the time it takes a premature infant to progress to full oral feedings. This research demonstrates the effects of immaturity on neurobehavioral outcomes such as the integration of sucking with swallowing during oral nipple feeding. Patterns of nutritives sucking and breathing within a feeding provide us with an important window into the integrity of the developing central nervous system. Thus, signs and symptoms of apnea and/or periodic breathing should be used in determining feeding readiness assessments and progression to full nipple feeding in the NICU.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApnea and periodic breathing during bottle feeding of premature infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158241-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Apnea and periodic breathing during bottle feeding of premature infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McGrath, Jacqueline, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 873008, Tempe, AZ, 85287-3008, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">480.727.7380</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jacqueline.mcgrath@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statement of the Problem: Low birth weight preterm infants are often noted to have increased periodic breathing and apneic events with the introduction of oral nipple-feeding. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the progression of rhythmic breathing (ventilation stability) with oral nipple feeding during the advancement from the initiation of oral nipple feeding to attainment of full nipple feeding in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Infants who participated in this research were also members of a larger NIH-NINR study. Design &amp; Methods: Low birth weight preterm infants were followed with a weekly feeding protocol from the initiation of oral feeding through discharge from the NICU. Physiologic variables were collected with sucking variables during the first five minutes of a routine feeding with the Krons Nutritive Sucking Apparatus. The sample consisted of 68 preterm infants who were noted to have periodic breathing during initial data collection. These infants were followed to study the progression and maturation of ventilation stability with nipple feeding. Infants were studied in the NICU and until 44 weeks post-conceptual age in follow-up. Results: Preterm infants who participated in this projected were noted to demonstrate significantly increased apnea and periodic breathing during feeding (p= .04) as compared to times when not feeding that decreased over time. Maturation not experience appeared to be more correlated with this progression. Increases in ventilation stability were correlated with increasing post conceptional age. Restricted flow appeared to decrease both apnea and periodic breathing with feeding. In addition, feeding that was more infant directed appeared to decrease these diminished ventilation events. Implications: Apnea and Periodic breathing during feeding appear to be factors that are highly correlated with the time it takes a premature infant to progress to full oral feedings. This research demonstrates the effects of immaturity on neurobehavioral outcomes such as the integration of sucking with swallowing during oral nipple feeding. Patterns of nutritives sucking and breathing within a feeding provide us with an important window into the integrity of the developing central nervous system. Thus, signs and symptoms of apnea and/or periodic breathing should be used in determining feeding readiness assessments and progression to full nipple feeding in the NICU.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:39:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:39:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.