2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158244
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Myocardial Infarction Patient Educational Effectiveness Study
Abstract:
Myocardial Infarction Patient Educational Effectiveness Study
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Carter, Colleen
P.I. Institution Name:Kaiser Permanente-Woodland Hills
Contact Address:5601 DeSoto Avenue, Woodland Hills, CA, 91365, USA
Contact Telephone:818.719.3200
Researchers studying patient education have come to the consensus that widespread education with ongoing assessment and feed back is essential to improving patient outcomes. Inclusive in this educational process is validation of the educational process and its effectiveness. Specific aims. The specific objectives of this study was to determine which of a set of patient characteristics and inpatient teaching methodologies were the most statistically significant predictors of a myocardial infarction (MI) patient's knowledge of the "basic MI survival skills" at the time of follow-up in the outpatient setting. Design. This study had a naturalistic comparative, descriptive design. Sample. The sample was a non-probability sample of attendees at an outpatient "Healthy Heart" class. All cardiac patients and their significant others are referred to and then attend the class approximately 4-8weeks post discharge. There were a total of 263 class attendees that completed the survey. Of the attendees, 102 identified themselves as post MI patients. Data Collection. Subjects completed a three-part survey questionnaire. Section one collected demographic data. Section two collected data on the amount and type of education received, including an MI information packet, educational videos, inpatient MI class, individual instruction by the members of the health care team and an MI Patient Pre-discharge Quiz. Section three measured the knowledge retained of the "basic MI survival skills". Data were collected at each class over a one-year period at one medical center of a large HMO system. Results. The mean age of the subjects was 65 years. The subjects were mostly male (57%), were mainly Caucasian (88.8%), spoke English as their primary language(93.4%), and were highly educated with 64.2% reporting a college education or better. In evaluating the types of education the subjects received, there were statistically significant differences on the knowledge scores for the total quiz score and all of the sub-scores. Those subjects with inpatient education or both inpatient education and information packet always scored higher than those patients that received the information packet alone. Those patients taught by the RN always scored higher than those who received the information material alone. The most significant predictor of the MI quiz scores was being taught by the inpatient RN (beta=.259, t=2.696,p=.008) and the patient having a NTG prescription (beta=.218, t=2.269, p=.025). In addition, those subjects who had an RN review the pre-discharge quiz prior to discharge scored higher on the survey quiz(73% versus 80%, p=0.01) than those that had no review prior to discharge. Conclusions. The findings here demonstrate that the RN at the bedside plays an important strategic role in the MI patient's ability to recall the "basic MI survival skills" after discharge. The impact of this ability to recall survival skills on survival remains a next reasonable step. However, it is logical to hypothesize that the impact of the RN and the increased knowledge would also impact survival.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMyocardial Infarction Patient Educational Effectiveness Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158244-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Myocardial Infarction Patient Educational Effectiveness Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carter, Colleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kaiser Permanente-Woodland Hills</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">5601 DeSoto Avenue, Woodland Hills, CA, 91365, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">818.719.3200</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Researchers studying patient education have come to the consensus that widespread education with ongoing assessment and feed back is essential to improving patient outcomes. Inclusive in this educational process is validation of the educational process and its effectiveness. Specific aims. The specific objectives of this study was to determine which of a set of patient characteristics and inpatient teaching methodologies were the most statistically significant predictors of a myocardial infarction (MI) patient's knowledge of the &quot;basic MI survival skills&quot; at the time of follow-up in the outpatient setting. Design. This study had a naturalistic comparative, descriptive design. Sample. The sample was a non-probability sample of attendees at an outpatient &quot;Healthy Heart&quot; class. All cardiac patients and their significant others are referred to and then attend the class approximately 4-8weeks post discharge. There were a total of 263 class attendees that completed the survey. Of the attendees, 102 identified themselves as post MI patients. Data Collection. Subjects completed a three-part survey questionnaire. Section one collected demographic data. Section two collected data on the amount and type of education received, including an MI information packet, educational videos, inpatient MI class, individual instruction by the members of the health care team and an MI Patient Pre-discharge Quiz. Section three measured the knowledge retained of the &quot;basic MI survival skills&quot;. Data were collected at each class over a one-year period at one medical center of a large HMO system. Results. The mean age of the subjects was 65 years. The subjects were mostly male (57%), were mainly Caucasian (88.8%), spoke English as their primary language(93.4%), and were highly educated with 64.2% reporting a college education or better. In evaluating the types of education the subjects received, there were statistically significant differences on the knowledge scores for the total quiz score and all of the sub-scores. Those subjects with inpatient education or both inpatient education and information packet always scored higher than those patients that received the information packet alone. Those patients taught by the RN always scored higher than those who received the information material alone. The most significant predictor of the MI quiz scores was being taught by the inpatient RN (beta=.259, t=2.696,p=.008) and the patient having a NTG prescription (beta=.218, t=2.269, p=.025). In addition, those subjects who had an RN review the pre-discharge quiz prior to discharge scored higher on the survey quiz(73% versus 80%, p=0.01) than those that had no review prior to discharge. Conclusions. The findings here demonstrate that the RN at the bedside plays an important strategic role in the MI patient's ability to recall the &quot;basic MI survival skills&quot; after discharge. The impact of this ability to recall survival skills on survival remains a next reasonable step. However, it is logical to hypothesize that the impact of the RN and the increased knowledge would also impact survival.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:39:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:39:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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