2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158246
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Back pain in pregnancy: A feasibility study for an intervention
Abstract:
Back pain in pregnancy: A feasibility study for an intervention
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2001
Author:Carr, Catherine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Contact Address:School of Nursing, PO Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA
Contact Telephone:206.685.7814
Problem: Low back pain (LBP) is estimated to affect 50%-90% of pregnant women and may continue for up to 6 months postpartum. LBP compromises the pregnant woman's ability to work as well as her personal life, and is a common reason for sick leave time in pregnancy. In the general population, annual productivity losses due to back pain are estimated at $773 per female worker. In addition, some studies indicate that chronic low back pain frequently has its onset in pregnancy. Despite the high prevalence and significant disability of LBP in pregnancy, interventions have not been systematically evaluated in the U.S. Most studies are from Scandinavia, and focus on physiotherapy, exercise, and to a lesser extent, pharmacology. Usual care in the U.S. typically consists of recommendations for reduced activity, good body mechanics and posture, and avoiding long periods of standing. Framework: The use of support binders is traditional during the childbearing cycle in many countries. Mexican, Chinese, and Japanese women wear versions of a supportive sash or belt to support the belly during pregnancy and/or postpartum. More recently in the U.S., nylon and Velcro binders of many types have been marketed to pregnant women for relief of backache, varicose veins, and pelvic pressure. These interventions have not been tested in a research protocol. This pilot study tests the acceptability and feasibility of using a lumbosacral maternity support binder, the Loving Comfort (, as an intervention for LBP in pregnancy. Methods: English speaking pregnant women over 18 years and over 20 weeks gestation were recruited from antenatal clinics in a teaching hospital. Informed consent was obtained from each participant after screening for preexisting back conditions. On enrollment in the study, women completed a pre-intervention set of surveys that included demographic data, measures of LBP, and fatigue. After wearing the support binder during waking hours for 2 weeks, each woman completed the same survey instruments, plus a taped interview as a posttest. A total of 40 women were recruited, 10 control participants and 30 for the intervention. Findings: The study was still in process at the time of the submission. Initial participants expressed significant relief from LBP on the posttest interview. Expected outcomes include relief from LBP and lessening of pain-related fatigue. Conclusions: Many low cost interventions for the relief of common pregnancy discomforts are understudied and their potential effectiveness is not appreciated. This back support intervention, if effective and acceptable, could prove to be a safe and cost-effective relief measure for over 2 million women who experience LBP in pregnancy each year.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBack pain in pregnancy: A feasibility study for an interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158246-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Back pain in pregnancy: A feasibility study for an intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Carr, Catherine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, PO Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206.685.7814</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ccarr@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Low back pain (LBP) is estimated to affect 50%-90% of pregnant women and may continue for up to 6 months postpartum. LBP compromises the pregnant woman's ability to work as well as her personal life, and is a common reason for sick leave time in pregnancy. In the general population, annual productivity losses due to back pain are estimated at $773 per female worker. In addition, some studies indicate that chronic low back pain frequently has its onset in pregnancy. Despite the high prevalence and significant disability of LBP in pregnancy, interventions have not been systematically evaluated in the U.S. Most studies are from Scandinavia, and focus on physiotherapy, exercise, and to a lesser extent, pharmacology. Usual care in the U.S. typically consists of recommendations for reduced activity, good body mechanics and posture, and avoiding long periods of standing. Framework: The use of support binders is traditional during the childbearing cycle in many countries. Mexican, Chinese, and Japanese women wear versions of a supportive sash or belt to support the belly during pregnancy and/or postpartum. More recently in the U.S., nylon and Velcro binders of many types have been marketed to pregnant women for relief of backache, varicose veins, and pelvic pressure. These interventions have not been tested in a research protocol. This pilot study tests the acceptability and feasibility of using a lumbosacral maternity support binder, the Loving Comfort (, as an intervention for LBP in pregnancy. Methods: English speaking pregnant women over 18 years and over 20 weeks gestation were recruited from antenatal clinics in a teaching hospital. Informed consent was obtained from each participant after screening for preexisting back conditions. On enrollment in the study, women completed a pre-intervention set of surveys that included demographic data, measures of LBP, and fatigue. After wearing the support binder during waking hours for 2 weeks, each woman completed the same survey instruments, plus a taped interview as a posttest. A total of 40 women were recruited, 10 control participants and 30 for the intervention. Findings: The study was still in process at the time of the submission. Initial participants expressed significant relief from LBP on the posttest interview. Expected outcomes include relief from LBP and lessening of pain-related fatigue. Conclusions: Many low cost interventions for the relief of common pregnancy discomforts are understudied and their potential effectiveness is not appreciated. This back support intervention, if effective and acceptable, could prove to be a safe and cost-effective relief measure for over 2 million women who experience LBP in pregnancy each year.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:39:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:39:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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