2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158247
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Activity Behaviors among Latinas with Heart Disease Risk Factors
Abstract:
Physical Activity Behaviors among Latinas with Heart Disease Risk Factors
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Juarbe, Teresa
P.I. Institution Name:University of California-San Francisco
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Family Health Care Nursing, 2 Koret Way, Box 0606, N431C, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0606, USA
Contact Telephone:415.476.9493
Research about cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and related risk behaviors in Latina women is lacking. Most studies have been of a descriptive nature and have contributed limited information on adherence to CVD-related dietary practices and physical activity. Physical activity is recognized not only for the benefits to overall physical health of the individual, but also for the perceived benefits to psychological and mental health of women of all ages. Women exercise less frequently than men, and as they get older their exercise participation decreases. Many scientists have focused on developing interventions to increase exercise participation and physical activity to prevent coronary heart disease in Anglo women, but corresponding research and intervention studies are lacking for Latina women. It has been reported that Latina women do not exercise on a regular basis, have sedentary lifestyles, and are less likely to do physical activities at work. The purpose of this cohort study was to describe adherence to CVD-related diet, physical activity, and exercise practices of 223 Mexican and Central American women recruited from six counties in Northern California. Caspersen and colleagues (1985) definition of physical activity "bodily movements produced by skeletal muscles and resulting in energy expenditure" and exercise "subset of physical activities that are planned, structured, and repetitive, and that has the potential to improve or maintain cardiovascular fitness" was used. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with Latina women who have at least one risk factor for CVD. One hundred forty-four Central American (65%) and 79 (35%) Mexican women (n=223) ages 40 to 75 (59 ± 9) are participating in the study. The sample consists of low-income mostly monolingual Latinas with less than 8 years of education. However, 63% (140) have access to health care. Most women have access through Medical HMOs (40, 29%), private HMO (36, 26%), and Medicare (11, 8%), This group of women was found to be disproportionately affected by multiple risk factors with a mean cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor index of 6 (SD=1.3). According to body mass index and the waist-to-hip ratio, most of the participants are overweight (64, 29%) or obese (110, 49%) and at an increased risk to develop CVD (198, 89%). Ninety percent of the women (201) were not engaged in regular physical activity. The small number that were physically active were more likely to be engaged in brisk walking (11, 24%). The mean estimated energy expenditure (kJ·kg-1·wk-1) was 273 (± 56). Physical activities of low to moderate intensity during work, rather than leisure time, accounted for most of the energy expenditure in daily physical activities. Overall, results indicate that women in this cohort are at a greater risk for mortality and morbidity from CVD. As the largest segment of health care providers, nurses are in a unique position to promote adherence to physical activity. The results from this study contribute to nursing science by providing gender, ethnic, and culture-specific information that is currently in use to develop an intervention that may contribute to the scientific base for nursing practice to reduce health disparities among Latinas.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical Activity Behaviors among Latinas with Heart Disease Risk Factorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158247-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physical Activity Behaviors among Latinas with Heart Disease Risk Factors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Juarbe, Teresa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California-San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Family Health Care Nursing, 2 Koret Way, Box 0606, N431C, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0606, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415.476.9493</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">teresa.juarbe@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research about cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and related risk behaviors in Latina women is lacking. Most studies have been of a descriptive nature and have contributed limited information on adherence to CVD-related dietary practices and physical activity. Physical activity is recognized not only for the benefits to overall physical health of the individual, but also for the perceived benefits to psychological and mental health of women of all ages. Women exercise less frequently than men, and as they get older their exercise participation decreases. Many scientists have focused on developing interventions to increase exercise participation and physical activity to prevent coronary heart disease in Anglo women, but corresponding research and intervention studies are lacking for Latina women. It has been reported that Latina women do not exercise on a regular basis, have sedentary lifestyles, and are less likely to do physical activities at work. The purpose of this cohort study was to describe adherence to CVD-related diet, physical activity, and exercise practices of 223 Mexican and Central American women recruited from six counties in Northern California. Caspersen and colleagues (1985) definition of physical activity &quot;bodily movements produced by skeletal muscles and resulting in energy expenditure&quot; and exercise &quot;subset of physical activities that are planned, structured, and repetitive, and that has the potential to improve or maintain cardiovascular fitness&quot; was used. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with Latina women who have at least one risk factor for CVD. One hundred forty-four Central American (65%) and 79 (35%) Mexican women (n=223) ages 40 to 75 (59 &plusmn; 9) are participating in the study. The sample consists of low-income mostly monolingual Latinas with less than 8 years of education. However, 63% (140) have access to health care. Most women have access through Medical HMOs (40, 29%), private HMO (36, 26%), and Medicare (11, 8%), This group of women was found to be disproportionately affected by multiple risk factors with a mean cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor index of 6 (SD=1.3). According to body mass index and the waist-to-hip ratio, most of the participants are overweight (64, 29%) or obese (110, 49%) and at an increased risk to develop CVD (198, 89%). Ninety percent of the women (201) were not engaged in regular physical activity. The small number that were physically active were more likely to be engaged in brisk walking (11, 24%). The mean estimated energy expenditure (kJ&middot;kg-1&middot;wk-1) was 273 (&plusmn; 56). Physical activities of low to moderate intensity during work, rather than leisure time, accounted for most of the energy expenditure in daily physical activities. Overall, results indicate that women in this cohort are at a greater risk for mortality and morbidity from CVD. As the largest segment of health care providers, nurses are in a unique position to promote adherence to physical activity. The results from this study contribute to nursing science by providing gender, ethnic, and culture-specific information that is currently in use to develop an intervention that may contribute to the scientific base for nursing practice to reduce health disparities among Latinas.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:39:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:39:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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