2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158248
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hormone Replacement Therapy Adherence in Latinas at Risk for Heart Disease
Abstract:
Hormone Replacement Therapy Adherence in Latinas at Risk for Heart Disease
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Birkhead, Ana
P.I. Institution Name:University of California-San Francisco
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Family Health Care Nursing, 2 Koret Way, Box 0244, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0606, USA
The use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in women of diverse ethnic cultures is a topic that is slowly taking on some importance in women's health research. Most studies conducted on the use of HRT have focused on higher-income, higher educated, Caucasian women (Pilote, & Hlatky, 1995; Utian, & Boggs, 1999). There is a scarcity of information on the use of HRT in Latinas. Despite the overwhelming amount of literature regarding the risks (Hulley, et. al., 1998; Lobo, 2001; Writing Group of PEPI trial, 1995) and potential benefits of HRT (Appling, et al, 2000), several authors have shown a low rate use of HRT. Approximately 50% of postmenopausal women use HRT, and 40% of the women who use it, stay on it for longer than five years. Using a cross-sectional, descriptive design, self-reported data were collected on past and present use of HRT from 223 Central (n=144) and Mexican American women (n=79) with a mean age of 59 years (± 9). The participants are part of cohort study that is exploring CVD risk factor behaviors within a social feminist framework. The sample included mostly monolingual, low income and low acculturated Latinas with less than 8 years of education. The interview packet included bio-behavioral, psychosocial, and sociodemographic variables, and CVD-related physiological measures. The section on past and current use of HRT included questions such as "Has a doctor ever recommended HRT? Are you taking hormones now? Have you used HRT in the past? What was the primary reason that your doctor recommended HRT? How long did you use HRT continuously? Why did you discontinue your HRT treatment?" One hundred thirty-one women (59%) stated that their personal health care provider recommended the use of HRT and 52% (72) were presently using HRT. The three most common reasons for HRT recommendation was hysterectomy (32%), hot flashes (20%), and to prevent osteoporosis (11%). An alarming finding was the large number of women who had experienced a hysterectomy as early as age 26. Despite previous beliefs that Latinas may suffer ethnic-biased recommendations for HRT, the results show that a large number of women in this sample were prescribed and adhere to HRT recommendations. Furthermore, many were aware of the symptoms or health-related benefits that led to this medical recommendation. Prospective studies that evaluate the onset of menopausal symptoms, provider recommendations, self-care strategies, and HRT adherence measures over time are warranted to better inform nursing practice on the specific needs of Latina women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHormone Replacement Therapy Adherence in Latinas at Risk for Heart Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158248-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hormone Replacement Therapy Adherence in Latinas at Risk for Heart Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Birkhead, Ana</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California-San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Family Health Care Nursing, 2 Koret Way, Box 0244, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0606, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">anabirk@pacbell.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in women of diverse ethnic cultures is a topic that is slowly taking on some importance in women's health research. Most studies conducted on the use of HRT have focused on higher-income, higher educated, Caucasian women (Pilote, &amp; Hlatky, 1995; Utian, &amp; Boggs, 1999). There is a scarcity of information on the use of HRT in Latinas. Despite the overwhelming amount of literature regarding the risks (Hulley, et. al., 1998; Lobo, 2001; Writing Group of PEPI trial, 1995) and potential benefits of HRT (Appling, et al, 2000), several authors have shown a low rate use of HRT. Approximately 50% of postmenopausal women use HRT, and 40% of the women who use it, stay on it for longer than five years. Using a cross-sectional, descriptive design, self-reported data were collected on past and present use of HRT from 223 Central (n=144) and Mexican American women (n=79) with a mean age of 59 years (&plusmn; 9). The participants are part of cohort study that is exploring CVD risk factor behaviors within a social feminist framework. The sample included mostly monolingual, low income and low acculturated Latinas with less than 8 years of education. The interview packet included bio-behavioral, psychosocial, and sociodemographic variables, and CVD-related physiological measures. The section on past and current use of HRT included questions such as &quot;Has a doctor ever recommended HRT? Are you taking hormones now? Have you used HRT in the past? What was the primary reason that your doctor recommended HRT? How long did you use HRT continuously? Why did you discontinue your HRT treatment?&quot; One hundred thirty-one women (59%) stated that their personal health care provider recommended the use of HRT and 52% (72) were presently using HRT. The three most common reasons for HRT recommendation was hysterectomy (32%), hot flashes (20%), and to prevent osteoporosis (11%). An alarming finding was the large number of women who had experienced a hysterectomy as early as age 26. Despite previous beliefs that Latinas may suffer ethnic-biased recommendations for HRT, the results show that a large number of women in this sample were prescribed and adhere to HRT recommendations. Furthermore, many were aware of the symptoms or health-related benefits that led to this medical recommendation. Prospective studies that evaluate the onset of menopausal symptoms, provider recommendations, self-care strategies, and HRT adherence measures over time are warranted to better inform nursing practice on the specific needs of Latina women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:39:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:39:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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