2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158251
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Management to Health Promotion: Personal & Environmental Modification
Abstract:
Symptom Management to Health Promotion: Personal & Environmental Modification
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Taylor, Diana
P.I. Institution Name:University of California-San Francisco
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing, 2 Koret Way, Box 0606, N411P, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0606, USA
Contact Telephone:415.476.4377
Purpose: The Perimenstrual Symptom Management Program (PMS-SMP), was evaluated to determine the short-term and long-term effectiveness of a multimodal, non-pharmacologic treatment package aimed at relieving the symptom and stress experience as well as increasing health behaviors. Intervention: The PMS-SMP included self-monitoring, personal choice, self-regulation, and self/environmental modification, administered within a group of peer support and professional guidance (12 hrs over 4 weeks). While most symptom management interventions focus on changing individual behavior, we added a component that included modification of social and structural stressors through social, communication, time management, and problem-solving skills training. Design/Sample: A longitudinal, quasi-experimental research design included a treatment and waiting-treatment (control) group comparison to test the self-monitoring or placebo effects and a one-group repeated measures design tested the long-term treatment effects. Retrospective and prospective symptom assessment identified 190 women with severe PMS (20-40 yrs), regular menses and not taking hormones; 134 were randomized into an early or a waiting-treatment group during the first baseline menstrual cycle, and 91 women completed the intervention (early treatment groups n=40; waiting treatment groups n=51). Methods: Repeated symptom and behavioral measures were obtained on multiple occasions: baseline (2 menstrual cycles prior to treatment) and 4 occasions post-treatment (3, 6, 12 and 18 months after treatment). The analysis included univariate descriptive statistics and repeated measures analyses. Findings: The PMS Symptom Management Program was effective in reducing premenstrual symptom severity by 75%, premenstrual depression and general distress by 30-54%, as well as increasing wellbeing, self-esteem and health behaviors in women experiencing severe PMS. While the most marked improvement was found in the first three months after treatment, improvement was maintained or enhanced in the long-term follow-up (12-18 months). In addition to self-modification strategies (dietary change and supplementation) and self-regulation strategies (meditation, exercise), women reported that environmental modification strategies were very helpful to treatment success, such as effective time/role management and the use of effective interpersonal communication and problem-solving strategies at home and work. Conclusions/Implications: While focused on perimenstrual symptom relief, these personal and environmental modification strategies are generally health promoting and can be applied to other women's health conditions such as stress-related conditions (heart disease, arthritis, immune system disorders), psychiatric disorders, or normative menstrual cycle transitions (menarche, postpartum, menopause). Funding from National Institute for Nursing Research (R29-NR02699), NIH.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Management to Health Promotion: Personal & Environmental Modificationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158251-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom Management to Health Promotion: Personal &amp; Environmental Modification</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Taylor, Diana</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California-San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Department of Family Health Care Nursing, 2 Koret Way, Box 0606, N411P, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0606, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415.476.4377</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">diana.taylor@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The Perimenstrual Symptom Management Program (PMS-SMP), was evaluated to determine the short-term and long-term effectiveness of a multimodal, non-pharmacologic treatment package aimed at relieving the symptom and stress experience as well as increasing health behaviors. Intervention: The PMS-SMP included self-monitoring, personal choice, self-regulation, and self/environmental modification, administered within a group of peer support and professional guidance (12 hrs over 4 weeks). While most symptom management interventions focus on changing individual behavior, we added a component that included modification of social and structural stressors through social, communication, time management, and problem-solving skills training. Design/Sample: A longitudinal, quasi-experimental research design included a treatment and waiting-treatment (control) group comparison to test the self-monitoring or placebo effects and a one-group repeated measures design tested the long-term treatment effects. Retrospective and prospective symptom assessment identified 190 women with severe PMS (20-40 yrs), regular menses and not taking hormones; 134 were randomized into an early or a waiting-treatment group during the first baseline menstrual cycle, and 91 women completed the intervention (early treatment groups n=40; waiting treatment groups n=51). Methods: Repeated symptom and behavioral measures were obtained on multiple occasions: baseline (2 menstrual cycles prior to treatment) and 4 occasions post-treatment (3, 6, 12 and 18 months after treatment). The analysis included univariate descriptive statistics and repeated measures analyses. Findings: The PMS Symptom Management Program was effective in reducing premenstrual symptom severity by 75%, premenstrual depression and general distress by 30-54%, as well as increasing wellbeing, self-esteem and health behaviors in women experiencing severe PMS. While the most marked improvement was found in the first three months after treatment, improvement was maintained or enhanced in the long-term follow-up (12-18 months). In addition to self-modification strategies (dietary change and supplementation) and self-regulation strategies (meditation, exercise), women reported that environmental modification strategies were very helpful to treatment success, such as effective time/role management and the use of effective interpersonal communication and problem-solving strategies at home and work. Conclusions/Implications: While focused on perimenstrual symptom relief, these personal and environmental modification strategies are generally health promoting and can be applied to other women's health conditions such as stress-related conditions (heart disease, arthritis, immune system disorders), psychiatric disorders, or normative menstrual cycle transitions (menarche, postpartum, menopause). Funding from National Institute for Nursing Research (R29-NR02699), NIH.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:39:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:39:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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