2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158252
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Disparities: Quality Of Life And Social Capital
Abstract:
Gender Disparities: Quality Of Life And Social Capital
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Jordan-Marsh, Maryalice, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern California
Title:Associate Chair
Contact Address:1154 Alcazar Street, CHP 222V, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-9012, USA
Contact Telephone:323.442.1998
Purpose: New research suggests self perceived health status can be superior to clinical indicators in predicting morbidity and mortality, although results varied by gender (Idler, Russell & Davis, 2000). Second, social capital (in the form of relationships, norms, and structures) is a powerful predictor of health (Smedley & Syme 2000). Assessment of health perceptions and available social capital may explain gender disparities. In this study of family health issues, Korean, Chinese and Latino elders (N = 132) in Los Angeles participated in focus groups and an extensive questionnaire. 54% were women (n = 71). Participants were not highly acculturated despite living in the United States for more than 10 years (M = 1.37, SD = .70, Marin & Gamba, 1996 scale). Self perceived health was assessed using the SF-36 Health Survey in translation (Gandek & Ware, 1998). The median alpha coefficient for the eight subscales was .85, but internal consistency was lower for Social Functioning for two groups. Physical Health scores (PCS) for women were lower than scores for men (p.<.01 ; Kruskal-Wallis two sided value). Women were below the mean and men at the mean for national norms (Ware, Dewey, Kosinksi, 2001). Mental health (MCS) mean scores for women were lower than those of the men with the Chinese and Korean differences significant at p.<05 level (Wilcoxon 2 sample test). Women's MCS scores were lower than the national norms. Asked to check all that apply from eight sources of health information, men and women were similar. Physicians received the most votes (43% of each gender); newspapers, TV, and family were next in order. Nurses were last for each gender. Preliminary analysis indicates discrepant gender based health communication patterns. When asked who one would seek out first for a difficult health decision, 52% of men would go first to their wife. For women, only 25% named their husband, 30% named their physician. Based on focus group material, we concluded that what constitutes social capital varies by gender and to a lesser extent by ethnic group. Recommendations for selecting indicators of social capital such as friendship ties and family social support networks, neighborhood sense of efficacy, and resources for information and services will be presented. The implications for shifting the nursing paradigm from care of individuals to a socioecological view of health which assesses social capital of relationships within the family and across the community will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Disparities: Quality Of Life And Social Capitalen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158252-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender Disparities: Quality Of Life And Social Capital</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jordan-Marsh, Maryalice, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern California</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1154 Alcazar Street, CHP 222V, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-9012, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">323.442.1998</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jordanma@hsc.usc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: New research suggests self perceived health status can be superior to clinical indicators in predicting morbidity and mortality, although results varied by gender (Idler, Russell &amp; Davis, 2000). Second, social capital (in the form of relationships, norms, and structures) is a powerful predictor of health (Smedley &amp; Syme 2000). Assessment of health perceptions and available social capital may explain gender disparities. In this study of family health issues, Korean, Chinese and Latino elders (N = 132) in Los Angeles participated in focus groups and an extensive questionnaire. 54% were women (n = 71). Participants were not highly acculturated despite living in the United States for more than 10 years (M = 1.37, SD = .70, Marin &amp; Gamba, 1996 scale). Self perceived health was assessed using the SF-36 Health Survey in translation (Gandek &amp; Ware, 1998). The median alpha coefficient for the eight subscales was .85, but internal consistency was lower for Social Functioning for two groups. Physical Health scores (PCS) for women were lower than scores for men (p.&lt;.01 ; Kruskal-Wallis two sided value). Women were below the mean and men at the mean for national norms (Ware, Dewey, Kosinksi, 2001). Mental health (MCS) mean scores for women were lower than those of the men with the Chinese and Korean differences significant at p.&lt;05 level (Wilcoxon 2 sample test). Women's MCS scores were lower than the national norms. Asked to check all that apply from eight sources of health information, men and women were similar. Physicians received the most votes (43% of each gender); newspapers, TV, and family were next in order. Nurses were last for each gender. Preliminary analysis indicates discrepant gender based health communication patterns. When asked who one would seek out first for a difficult health decision, 52% of men would go first to their wife. For women, only 25% named their husband, 30% named their physician. Based on focus group material, we concluded that what constitutes social capital varies by gender and to a lesser extent by ethnic group. Recommendations for selecting indicators of social capital such as friendship ties and family social support networks, neighborhood sense of efficacy, and resources for information and services will be presented. The implications for shifting the nursing paradigm from care of individuals to a socioecological view of health which assesses social capital of relationships within the family and across the community will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:39:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:39:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.