2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158254
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maternal serum screening: Women's experiences
Abstract:
Maternal serum screening: Women's experiences
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Denson, Vicki
Maternal serum screening is quickly becoming a routine prenatal test for women of all ages and socioeconomic backgrounds despite the growing concern for psychosocial and ethical implications. Existing literature is predominantly focused on women's knowledge levels regarding screening and the adequacy of informed consent. Little information exists regarding conflict women experience following screening and what impact knowledge of results may have on the motherhood role and acceptance of pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to describe to what extent pregnant women who undergo or decline to undergo maternal serum screening experience conflict in identification with the role of motherhood and the acceptance of pregnancy as measured by the Lederman Prenatal Self-Evaluation Questionnaire. The goal was to gain information about the degree to which the pregnant woman's knowledge of screening results influences maternal role development during pregnancy. In addition, information was gathered using the same measures with women who declined to have screening done. A convenience sample consisting of 100 gravid women were recruited from a private obstetrician's office in a Southwestern metropolitan area. A quantitative/qualitative descriptive approach using triangulation was implemented to describe the conflict women may experience in maternal role development. This method was augmented with twelve qualitative interviews. The open-ended, structured interviews were conducted identifying common themes that captured the essence of the women's experiences subsequent to making a decision about screening. All subjects completed a sociodemographic questionnaire as well as Lederman's Prenatal Self-Evaluation Questionnaire which assessed the level of conflict following maternal serum screening on the developmental tasks of pregnancy. Neuman's system model (1982) and Taylor's theory of cognitive adaptation to threatening events (1983) served as conceptual frameworks for this study. Based on the mean scores of the questionnaire, women who opted for maternal serum screening experienced higher conflict in acceptance of pregnancy and identification with a motherhood role versus women who declined screening. Further investigation revealed an unexpected finding. Women whose screening results were negative experienced higher conflict in acceptance of pregnancy and identification with a motherhood role compared to those women whose screening results were positive. T-tests determined significant differences as follows: (a) women who opted for screening had higher conflict in acceptance of pregnancy compared to those women who declined screening, and (b) women who received negative screening results had increased conflict in identification with a motherhood role versus women who had positive screening results. Interviews with twelve women revealed that women who opt for screening have a "need to know" that the fetus is normal. Women with positive screening results go on for further prenatal diagnosis. For women with negative screening results, the "need to know" is not resolved by maternal serum screening alone, therefore these women are left in a conflicted state. The interviews also revealed that women were not thoroughly educated on prenatal screening. The major finding was the identification of gravid women who may be struggling with progression through the maternal developmental tasks related to prenatal screening. Based on this study, a major focus of this paper will be a discussion of the implications for health disparities that will guide the direction of future research as well as the development of clinical guidelines that will assist nurses in providing support to women in transition into the motherhood role.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaternal serum screening: Women's experiencesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158254-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Maternal serum screening: Women's experiences</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Denson, Vicki</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vdenson3@cox.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Maternal serum screening is quickly becoming a routine prenatal test for women of all ages and socioeconomic backgrounds despite the growing concern for psychosocial and ethical implications. Existing literature is predominantly focused on women's knowledge levels regarding screening and the adequacy of informed consent. Little information exists regarding conflict women experience following screening and what impact knowledge of results may have on the motherhood role and acceptance of pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to describe to what extent pregnant women who undergo or decline to undergo maternal serum screening experience conflict in identification with the role of motherhood and the acceptance of pregnancy as measured by the Lederman Prenatal Self-Evaluation Questionnaire. The goal was to gain information about the degree to which the pregnant woman's knowledge of screening results influences maternal role development during pregnancy. In addition, information was gathered using the same measures with women who declined to have screening done. A convenience sample consisting of 100 gravid women were recruited from a private obstetrician's office in a Southwestern metropolitan area. A quantitative/qualitative descriptive approach using triangulation was implemented to describe the conflict women may experience in maternal role development. This method was augmented with twelve qualitative interviews. The open-ended, structured interviews were conducted identifying common themes that captured the essence of the women's experiences subsequent to making a decision about screening. All subjects completed a sociodemographic questionnaire as well as Lederman's Prenatal Self-Evaluation Questionnaire which assessed the level of conflict following maternal serum screening on the developmental tasks of pregnancy. Neuman's system model (1982) and Taylor's theory of cognitive adaptation to threatening events (1983) served as conceptual frameworks for this study. Based on the mean scores of the questionnaire, women who opted for maternal serum screening experienced higher conflict in acceptance of pregnancy and identification with a motherhood role versus women who declined screening. Further investigation revealed an unexpected finding. Women whose screening results were negative experienced higher conflict in acceptance of pregnancy and identification with a motherhood role compared to those women whose screening results were positive. T-tests determined significant differences as follows: (a) women who opted for screening had higher conflict in acceptance of pregnancy compared to those women who declined screening, and (b) women who received negative screening results had increased conflict in identification with a motherhood role versus women who had positive screening results. Interviews with twelve women revealed that women who opt for screening have a &quot;need to know&quot; that the fetus is normal. Women with positive screening results go on for further prenatal diagnosis. For women with negative screening results, the &quot;need to know&quot; is not resolved by maternal serum screening alone, therefore these women are left in a conflicted state. The interviews also revealed that women were not thoroughly educated on prenatal screening. The major finding was the identification of gravid women who may be struggling with progression through the maternal developmental tasks related to prenatal screening. Based on this study, a major focus of this paper will be a discussion of the implications for health disparities that will guide the direction of future research as well as the development of clinical guidelines that will assist nurses in providing support to women in transition into the motherhood role.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:39:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:39:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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