2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158258
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Differing Perceptions of Social Competence of Adolescents with Schizophrenia
Abstract:
Differing Perceptions of Social Competence of Adolescents with Schizophrenia
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Schepp, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Department of Psychosocial & Community Health, Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA
Contact Telephone:206.685.3213
The purpose of this paper is to compare the similarities and differences in how adolescents with schizophrenia and their parents rate the adolescents' level of social competence. Mentally ill adolescents and their parents often differ in their general perceptions of the adolescents' ability to function socially but very rarely are their perceptions examined and rated and then compared. This paper is about such an examination of their perceptions. Social competency is defined as one's ability to relate to and get along with others in one's environment. Difficulty in relating to others or social dysfunction is one of the diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia. The adolescents with schizophrenia typically experience greater social dysfunction as the illness evolves and reaches the "first psychotic break" stage. This lack of social competency typically remains a constant problem for the adolescents following the "first break" and throughout their lives. Social competence is one of the key variables assessed in a clinical trial screening protocol for adolescents with schizophrenia. The clinical trial is a family centered, symptom management program for adolescents aged 15-19 who have schizophrenia. During the screening interview, the parent and the adolescent are asked separately to rate the adolescent's social functioning using the psychometrically sound Social Competence structured interview scale. The adolescent is rated on four areas of social functioning: 1) Leisure Activity and Recreation, 2) Social Relationships, 3) Academic Functioning, and 4) Family Relationships. The response scale ranges from 1) Major difficulties to 7) Superior Functioning. In comparing the scores of 30 parents and adolescents across all 4 areas, the adolescents consistently rate their level of social competence significantly higher than do the parents. (Leisure: Adol. mean score =3.8, SD=1.8; Parent=2.5, SD=1.5; Social: Adol. = 3.2, SD=1.7; Parent = 2.3, SD=1.6; Academic: Adol. = 3.1, SD=1.7; Parent= 2.1, SD=1.3; Family: Adol.=4.3, SD=1.7; Parent=3.2, SD=1.9). The degree of discrepancy in the ratings of social competence is an important finding. When mentally ill adolescents have a very different view of how they function socially, it is difficult for parents to be able to engage them in treatment that includes social skill enhancement if the adolescents do not see a problem in the way they relate to others. Other treatment implications for these adolescents involving their level of social competence will be presented in this paper and potential strategies for nurses working with these adolescents and their families will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiffering Perceptions of Social Competence of Adolescents with Schizophreniaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158258-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Differing Perceptions of Social Competence of Adolescents with Schizophrenia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schepp, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Department of Psychosocial &amp; Community Health, Box 357263, Seattle, WA, 98195-7263, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206.685.3213</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kschepp@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this paper is to compare the similarities and differences in how adolescents with schizophrenia and their parents rate the adolescents' level of social competence. Mentally ill adolescents and their parents often differ in their general perceptions of the adolescents' ability to function socially but very rarely are their perceptions examined and rated and then compared. This paper is about such an examination of their perceptions. Social competency is defined as one's ability to relate to and get along with others in one's environment. Difficulty in relating to others or social dysfunction is one of the diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia. The adolescents with schizophrenia typically experience greater social dysfunction as the illness evolves and reaches the &quot;first psychotic break&quot; stage. This lack of social competency typically remains a constant problem for the adolescents following the &quot;first break&quot; and throughout their lives. Social competence is one of the key variables assessed in a clinical trial screening protocol for adolescents with schizophrenia. The clinical trial is a family centered, symptom management program for adolescents aged 15-19 who have schizophrenia. During the screening interview, the parent and the adolescent are asked separately to rate the adolescent's social functioning using the psychometrically sound Social Competence structured interview scale. The adolescent is rated on four areas of social functioning: 1) Leisure Activity and Recreation, 2) Social Relationships, 3) Academic Functioning, and 4) Family Relationships. The response scale ranges from 1) Major difficulties to 7) Superior Functioning. In comparing the scores of 30 parents and adolescents across all 4 areas, the adolescents consistently rate their level of social competence significantly higher than do the parents. (Leisure: Adol. mean score =3.8, SD=1.8; Parent=2.5, SD=1.5; Social: Adol. = 3.2, SD=1.7; Parent = 2.3, SD=1.6; Academic: Adol. = 3.1, SD=1.7; Parent= 2.1, SD=1.3; Family: Adol.=4.3, SD=1.7; Parent=3.2, SD=1.9). The degree of discrepancy in the ratings of social competence is an important finding. When mentally ill adolescents have a very different view of how they function socially, it is difficult for parents to be able to engage them in treatment that includes social skill enhancement if the adolescents do not see a problem in the way they relate to others. Other treatment implications for these adolescents involving their level of social competence will be presented in this paper and potential strategies for nurses working with these adolescents and their families will be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:40:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:40:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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