2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158260
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acceptability Scale: Predicting Use and Willingness to Use Rural Health Care
Abstract:
Acceptability Scale: Predicting Use and Willingness to Use Rural Health Care
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Shreffler-Grant, M.
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA
Problem: Health care access has deteriorated in many rural areas due to closure of rural hospitals and the associated loss of local providers and services. Much of the blame for closures has been attributed to factors such as Medicare reimbursement, regional economy, and provider shortages. There is evidence, however, that underutilization of the local hospital by rural residents who bypass it to seek care in larger towns has been a contributing factor. Recently, new models of care, called Critical Access Hospitals are being implemented in rural areas with hospitals at risk for closure. Whether these new models are any more viable than hospitals will likely to tied to how they are viewed and used by the rural residents they are intended to serve. The purpose of this study was to examine rural residents' perspectives on access to health care in six rural communities with Critical Access Hospitals. As part of the study, "acceptability" was measured. Conceptual Framework: Access to care was conceptualized as having two dimensions: 1. potential access or properties of the population and health care system that affect opportunities to enter into the system, and 2. actual access or utilization/willingness to use the health care system and satisfaction with use. "Acceptability," a component of potential access, reflects consumers' attitudes and opinions about practice characteristics of local providers and services. Sample/Methods: A descriptive survey design was employed. Surveys were sent to a random sample of 100 households in each community and a subset of respondents was interviewed by telephone. A 63.5% response rate was obtained on the mail survey (N=381). Acceptability was one of several independent variables used in multivariate analyses to identify predictors of use/willingness to use local health care. Acceptability was a scale comprised of summed values of responses to twelve 5-point rating questions related to the concept of acceptability. The reliability coefficients for the scale were Alpha = .97, standardized item alpha =.97; inter-item correlations ranged from .54 to .88. Results: The acceptability scale was the most consistent predictor of use and willingness to use local health care in the six rural towns. The scale also predicted satisfaction with care. Other significant predictors included age, income, knowledge of local services, and community affiliation. Conclusions: Unlike other components of access, acceptability reflects an opinion, a judgment, and personal preferences on the part of consumers. Rural residents are not as affected by distance as they once were and this study suggests that those who do not find local health care acceptable vote with their feet. By improving our understanding of what rural consumers deem acceptable in terms of services and providers, the results can be use to improve health care access for rural residents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcceptability Scale: Predicting Use and Willingness to Use Rural Health Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158260-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Acceptability Scale: Predicting Use and Willingness to Use Rural Health Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shreffler-Grant, M.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812-7416, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jeansh@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Health care access has deteriorated in many rural areas due to closure of rural hospitals and the associated loss of local providers and services. Much of the blame for closures has been attributed to factors such as Medicare reimbursement, regional economy, and provider shortages. There is evidence, however, that underutilization of the local hospital by rural residents who bypass it to seek care in larger towns has been a contributing factor. Recently, new models of care, called Critical Access Hospitals are being implemented in rural areas with hospitals at risk for closure. Whether these new models are any more viable than hospitals will likely to tied to how they are viewed and used by the rural residents they are intended to serve. The purpose of this study was to examine rural residents' perspectives on access to health care in six rural communities with Critical Access Hospitals. As part of the study, &quot;acceptability&quot; was measured. Conceptual Framework: Access to care was conceptualized as having two dimensions: 1. potential access or properties of the population and health care system that affect opportunities to enter into the system, and 2. actual access or utilization/willingness to use the health care system and satisfaction with use. &quot;Acceptability,&quot; a component of potential access, reflects consumers' attitudes and opinions about practice characteristics of local providers and services. Sample/Methods: A descriptive survey design was employed. Surveys were sent to a random sample of 100 households in each community and a subset of respondents was interviewed by telephone. A 63.5% response rate was obtained on the mail survey (N=381). Acceptability was one of several independent variables used in multivariate analyses to identify predictors of use/willingness to use local health care. Acceptability was a scale comprised of summed values of responses to twelve 5-point rating questions related to the concept of acceptability. The reliability coefficients for the scale were Alpha = .97, standardized item alpha =.97; inter-item correlations ranged from .54 to .88. Results: The acceptability scale was the most consistent predictor of use and willingness to use local health care in the six rural towns. The scale also predicted satisfaction with care. Other significant predictors included age, income, knowledge of local services, and community affiliation. Conclusions: Unlike other components of access, acceptability reflects an opinion, a judgment, and personal preferences on the part of consumers. Rural residents are not as affected by distance as they once were and this study suggests that those who do not find local health care acceptable vote with their feet. By improving our understanding of what rural consumers deem acceptable in terms of services and providers, the results can be use to improve health care access for rural residents.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:40:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:40:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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