Availability and Acceptability of Health Care Services in Rural Areas of Montana

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158261
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Availability and Acceptability of Health Care Services in Rural Areas of Montana
Abstract:
Availability and Acceptability of Health Care Services in Rural Areas of Montana
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Zulkowski, Karen, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Box 574, Billings, MT, 59101, USA
Contact Telephone:406.657.1739
Need for study. Elderly persons often rely on whatever health care, social, or nutritional services are available in their rural community. Many of the rural towns are extremely small so access to needed care often requires travel of long distance. Weather and road conditions may limit the elderly persons ability to travel and public transportation is often lacking. Low population densities make availability of needed health, social, and nutritional services questionable in geographically isolated areas of Montana. Even if some level of service is available locally, this does not ensure seniors are willing to use them. The purpose of this study was to examine availability of health care, social and nutritional services in rural areas of Montana. Barriers or willingness to use local programs was also examined Conceptual Framework. This study utilized a combination of concepts derived from nursing theory and the community capacity model as a framework. Examine of community capacity is an essential part of any program of change. In this model if a capacity were lacking in a community then the aim of future programs would be to augment that deficiency thereby adding to the community's assets. This in turn could enhance the health status of the community and its members. Methods/Sample. All senior centers in rural areas of Montana as well as 80 rural elderly individuals were surveyed to examine nutritional, health and social services available in their area. Eight-eight out of a possible 149 senior centers returned questionnaires. The majority of responds lived in farming/ranching communities. Findings/Results. Community strengths included the availability of congregate meal programs, home delivered meal programs, and grocery stores as well as availability of a primary health care provider and EMS services in their community. Deficits included lack of other medical services or health educators, hospice, and mental health services, and drug/alcohol programs. The rural elderly did not view geographic distance to service as a problem. Programs were considered available in their community even if they were located 60 miles away. They did identify a lack of meal program volunteers, an increasing numbers of elderly in the rural communities that overwhelm available services, and elderly people that were "too proud" to use services they were entitled to as barriers. Conclusions. Health care reimbursement makes sustaining some programs in rural areas difficult and certain services were consistently absent. Distance to services has long been considered a limit to accessibility of needed services. Elderly themselves did not share this view. This may not mean that it is not problematic for elderly to travel these distances, rather it indicates that health care professionals may need to reassess their opinion of what rural elderly consider available. Results of this study indicate creative and new approaches may be necessary to continue to bring additional needed services to rural communities throughout Montana as well as increase use at existing programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAvailability and Acceptability of Health Care Services in Rural Areas of Montanaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158261-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Availability and Acceptability of Health Care Services in Rural Areas of Montana</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zulkowski, Karen, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Box 574, Billings, MT, 59101, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406.657.1739</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karenz@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Need for study. Elderly persons often rely on whatever health care, social, or nutritional services are available in their rural community. Many of the rural towns are extremely small so access to needed care often requires travel of long distance. Weather and road conditions may limit the elderly persons ability to travel and public transportation is often lacking. Low population densities make availability of needed health, social, and nutritional services questionable in geographically isolated areas of Montana. Even if some level of service is available locally, this does not ensure seniors are willing to use them. The purpose of this study was to examine availability of health care, social and nutritional services in rural areas of Montana. Barriers or willingness to use local programs was also examined Conceptual Framework. This study utilized a combination of concepts derived from nursing theory and the community capacity model as a framework. Examine of community capacity is an essential part of any program of change. In this model if a capacity were lacking in a community then the aim of future programs would be to augment that deficiency thereby adding to the community's assets. This in turn could enhance the health status of the community and its members. Methods/Sample. All senior centers in rural areas of Montana as well as 80 rural elderly individuals were surveyed to examine nutritional, health and social services available in their area. Eight-eight out of a possible 149 senior centers returned questionnaires. The majority of responds lived in farming/ranching communities. Findings/Results. Community strengths included the availability of congregate meal programs, home delivered meal programs, and grocery stores as well as availability of a primary health care provider and EMS services in their community. Deficits included lack of other medical services or health educators, hospice, and mental health services, and drug/alcohol programs. The rural elderly did not view geographic distance to service as a problem. Programs were considered available in their community even if they were located 60 miles away. They did identify a lack of meal program volunteers, an increasing numbers of elderly in the rural communities that overwhelm available services, and elderly people that were &quot;too proud&quot; to use services they were entitled to as barriers. Conclusions. Health care reimbursement makes sustaining some programs in rural areas difficult and certain services were consistently absent. Distance to services has long been considered a limit to accessibility of needed services. Elderly themselves did not share this view. This may not mean that it is not problematic for elderly to travel these distances, rather it indicates that health care professionals may need to reassess their opinion of what rural elderly consider available. Results of this study indicate creative and new approaches may be necessary to continue to bring additional needed services to rural communities throughout Montana as well as increase use at existing programs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:40:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:40:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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