2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158262
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Discovery of baccalaureate nursing students' social styles
Abstract:
Discovery of baccalaureate nursing students' social styles
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Gilchrist, Kathleen
P.I. Institution Name:California State University-Bakersfield
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 9001 Stockdale Highway, RNEC 132, Bakersfield, CA, 93311, USA
Introduction: Nursing student and faculty social interactions are requisite to the educational process. Social interactions with nursing students and faculty aid in promoting and fostering professional development in nursing students. Professional socialization into nursing is explicated as the process through which an individual acquires the knowledge and skills of a profession and a sense of professional identity. Literature indicates professional values are acquired through the educational process and socialization. Nursing faculty serve as the primary role model for nursing students by teaching, modeling, incorporating interactive learning experiences and displaying values of the professional nursing role. Knowing nursing students' social styles will assist nursing faculty in selecting appropriate types of classroom learning activities. There have been few research studies to determine the significance of nursing student and faculty social interactions in the classroom setting. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive study was to explore and identify the relationships of social styles of a convenience sample of 125 baccalaureate nursing students. It is the premise of this study that social styles may affect the professional development of nursing students. Therefore, the relationship between nursing student's social styles and the factors that may affect social style are important to research. Research Questions: What is the relationship between the directive scores and affiliative scores on the Self Profile tool of baccalaureate nursing students and the following variables: age, gender, ethnicity, residency, semester/year, and question 28, and 30 on the Self Profile tool? Methods: From Fall 1995 through Spring 1998, baccalaureate nursing students were asked to answer the Self Profile (1987), a social style tool with 30 general questions describing how a person might act in a given situation. The Self Profile tool was administered to each of the Medical Surgical nursing classes. Results: Demographic results revealed 80.8% of students were female and 19.2% were male. The Directive Score had a ß of 37.961 with a standard error of 2.337. The Affiliative Score had a ß of 13.857 with a standard error of 2.931. There were no relationships identified between the Directive or Affiliative scores of baccalaureate nursing students and the following variables: age, gender, ethnicity, residency, semester/year, and question 30. The Affiliative Score was negatively correlated with Question 28 (-.390). This accounts for 15% of the variance shared between these two variables. Post hoc determination of the Total Score and Affiliative Score, and the Total Score and Directive Score demonstrated a strong positive relationship. Conclusions/Implications: Twenty-six percent of nursing students resided in another state. Social interactions with out of state students could be affected because they may not have the same amount of time with peers and faculty, however the results did not support this assumption. Demographic variables did not demonstrate a relationship between the Directive and Affiliative Scores. Instead, the Total Score substantiated a strong positive relationship with these two variables indicating that both social styles were present in baccalaureate nursing students. It would be useful for professors to have a more comprehensive understanding of nursing students' social styles in order to select appropriate types of classroom learning activities. Modifications in course design and appropriate learning environments can be incorporated into the classroom settings based on the social styles of baccalaureate nursing students. In this case, learning experiences need to incorporate both the affiliative and directive components. More research is required to validate these findings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDiscovery of baccalaureate nursing students' social stylesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158262-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Discovery of baccalaureate nursing students' social styles</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gilchrist, Kathleen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University-Bakersfield</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 9001 Stockdale Highway, RNEC 132, Bakersfield, CA, 93311, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kgilchrist@csub.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Nursing student and faculty social interactions are requisite to the educational process. Social interactions with nursing students and faculty aid in promoting and fostering professional development in nursing students. Professional socialization into nursing is explicated as the process through which an individual acquires the knowledge and skills of a profession and a sense of professional identity. Literature indicates professional values are acquired through the educational process and socialization. Nursing faculty serve as the primary role model for nursing students by teaching, modeling, incorporating interactive learning experiences and displaying values of the professional nursing role. Knowing nursing students' social styles will assist nursing faculty in selecting appropriate types of classroom learning activities. There have been few research studies to determine the significance of nursing student and faculty social interactions in the classroom setting. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive study was to explore and identify the relationships of social styles of a convenience sample of 125 baccalaureate nursing students. It is the premise of this study that social styles may affect the professional development of nursing students. Therefore, the relationship between nursing student's social styles and the factors that may affect social style are important to research. Research Questions: What is the relationship between the directive scores and affiliative scores on the Self Profile tool of baccalaureate nursing students and the following variables: age, gender, ethnicity, residency, semester/year, and question 28, and 30 on the Self Profile tool? Methods: From Fall 1995 through Spring 1998, baccalaureate nursing students were asked to answer the Self Profile (1987), a social style tool with 30 general questions describing how a person might act in a given situation. The Self Profile tool was administered to each of the Medical Surgical nursing classes. Results: Demographic results revealed 80.8% of students were female and 19.2% were male. The Directive Score had a &szlig; of 37.961 with a standard error of 2.337. The Affiliative Score had a &szlig; of 13.857 with a standard error of 2.931. There were no relationships identified between the Directive or Affiliative scores of baccalaureate nursing students and the following variables: age, gender, ethnicity, residency, semester/year, and question 30. The Affiliative Score was negatively correlated with Question 28 (-.390). This accounts for 15% of the variance shared between these two variables. Post hoc determination of the Total Score and Affiliative Score, and the Total Score and Directive Score demonstrated a strong positive relationship. Conclusions/Implications: Twenty-six percent of nursing students resided in another state. Social interactions with out of state students could be affected because they may not have the same amount of time with peers and faculty, however the results did not support this assumption. Demographic variables did not demonstrate a relationship between the Directive and Affiliative Scores. Instead, the Total Score substantiated a strong positive relationship with these two variables indicating that both social styles were present in baccalaureate nursing students. It would be useful for professors to have a more comprehensive understanding of nursing students' social styles in order to select appropriate types of classroom learning activities. Modifications in course design and appropriate learning environments can be incorporated into the classroom settings based on the social styles of baccalaureate nursing students. In this case, learning experiences need to incorporate both the affiliative and directive components. More research is required to validate these findings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:40:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:40:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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