Acculturation and Perinatal Risk in Mexican American Women Giving Birth in Utah

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158263
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acculturation and Perinatal Risk in Mexican American Women Giving Birth in Utah
Abstract:
Acculturation and Perinatal Risk in Mexican American Women Giving Birth in Utah
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Callister, Lynn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 136 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602-5544, USA
Contact Telephone:801.422.3227
Hispanics constitute the largest and fastest growing minority group in the United States. Sixty-four percent of Hispanics are of Mexican descent, with two thirds of Hispanic births being to Mexican American mothers. Less acculturated Mexican American women and their newborns with a traditional cultural orientation appear to have a perinatal advantage despite social risks such as low levels of maternal education, income, and less use of prenatal care. Postulated protective cultural factors include maintenance of traditional dietary practices, promotion of a healthy lifestyle including low levels of substance abuse, a caring and supportive family network, and value systems including a spiritual lifestyle and strong religious beliefs and practices. Focused investigation is needed in order to understand the relationship between cultural beliefs, values, and practices, and the health and well being of Mexican American women and their children. The presentation reports on the relationship between the level of acculturation, patterns of prenatal care, and perinatal outcomes in 300 Mexican American women giving birth in Utah. The conceptual model used in this study was developed by the University of Washington Center for Women=s Health Research, and suggests an interaction between the woman=s health status and socio-cultural context contribute to her vulnerability or resilience (Killien & McGrath, 2000). The General Acculturation Scale was used to determine the level of acculturation. Perinatal outcomes, including birth weight and maternal/infant heath, and demographic information were obtained from examining health records. The Kessner Index and Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Index were used to evaluate the adequacy and utilization of prenatal care based on the health records perinatal outcomes. Correlations and regression analyses showed significant relationships between acculturation scores, prenatal care, and perinatal outcomes. This work confirms the findings of other studies that less acculturated Mexican American women enjoy a perinatal advantage in spite of social risks. These findings contribute to our knowledge about cultural protective and behavioral risk factors in Mexican childbearing women and their families and should be used to improve intervention efforts directed at this cultural group. Community based programs should be designed which encourage the retention of protective cultural practices in Mexican American women. Further research should be done to document personal perspectives of Mexican American women related to perceptions of their cultural beliefs, values, and practices contribute to positive perinatal outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcculturation and Perinatal Risk in Mexican American Women Giving Birth in Utahen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158263-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Acculturation and Perinatal Risk in Mexican American Women Giving Birth in Utah</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Callister, Lynn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 136 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602-5544, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801.422.3227</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynn_callister@byu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hispanics constitute the largest and fastest growing minority group in the United States. Sixty-four percent of Hispanics are of Mexican descent, with two thirds of Hispanic births being to Mexican American mothers. Less acculturated Mexican American women and their newborns with a traditional cultural orientation appear to have a perinatal advantage despite social risks such as low levels of maternal education, income, and less use of prenatal care. Postulated protective cultural factors include maintenance of traditional dietary practices, promotion of a healthy lifestyle including low levels of substance abuse, a caring and supportive family network, and value systems including a spiritual lifestyle and strong religious beliefs and practices. Focused investigation is needed in order to understand the relationship between cultural beliefs, values, and practices, and the health and well being of Mexican American women and their children. The presentation reports on the relationship between the level of acculturation, patterns of prenatal care, and perinatal outcomes in 300 Mexican American women giving birth in Utah. The conceptual model used in this study was developed by the University of Washington Center for Women=s Health Research, and suggests an interaction between the woman=s health status and socio-cultural context contribute to her vulnerability or resilience (Killien &amp; McGrath, 2000). The General Acculturation Scale was used to determine the level of acculturation. Perinatal outcomes, including birth weight and maternal/infant heath, and demographic information were obtained from examining health records. The Kessner Index and Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Index were used to evaluate the adequacy and utilization of prenatal care based on the health records perinatal outcomes. Correlations and regression analyses showed significant relationships between acculturation scores, prenatal care, and perinatal outcomes. This work confirms the findings of other studies that less acculturated Mexican American women enjoy a perinatal advantage in spite of social risks. These findings contribute to our knowledge about cultural protective and behavioral risk factors in Mexican childbearing women and their families and should be used to improve intervention efforts directed at this cultural group. Community based programs should be designed which encourage the retention of protective cultural practices in Mexican American women. Further research should be done to document personal perspectives of Mexican American women related to perceptions of their cultural beliefs, values, and practices contribute to positive perinatal outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:40:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:40:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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