Argentine childbearing women living in Tucuman: Facilitators and barriers to prenatal care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158264
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Argentine childbearing women living in Tucuman: Facilitators and barriers to prenatal care
Abstract:
Argentine childbearing women living in Tucuman: Facilitators and barriers to prenatal care
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Coverston, Catherine
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 544 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602-5544, USA
Contact Telephone:801.422.5613
Tucman is one of the poorest, yet most populous provinces of Argentina. The public maternity hospital in Tucuman, which has about 14,000 births per year, has drawn the attention of UNICEF and the World Health Organization because it has one of this developing country=s highest infant and maternal mortality rates. The infant mortality rate has been estimated at between 20 and 40 per thousand births, while the maternal mortality rate is estimated at close to 100 per 100,000 births. The purpose of this research was to identify facilitators and barriers to prenatal care in the province of Tucuman. This had been targeted by local health care providers as a primary concern. Approximately 80% of women in the province receive either nor or inadequate prenatal care. Utilization of prenatal care is of concern in Latina populations throughout the Americas, including the United States, since culture and poverty combine to create barriers to that care. Latina women are also confident that they know how to care for themselves during pregnancy since in many Latin countries there is prestige associated with motherhood and these women take pride in being knowledgeable about childbearing. They frequently eschew prescribed prenatal care with the exception of technologic interventions such as ultrasound. A group of bilingual undergraduate faculty and students interviewed 18 women who had just given birth at the Maternity Hospital in Tucuman regarding barriers and facilitators to there prenatal care. The women had an excellent understanding of nutrition and lifestyle issues related to positive perinatal outcomes. Women who believed prenatal care would make a difference in outcomes managed to overcome poverty and other barriers such as transportation, embarrassment, and negative clinic experiences to access that care. The women who sought the most prenatal care experienced medical complications. Unfortunately, only a few of the women with uncomplicated pregnancies sought prenatal care. Those who did were more oriented to pregnancy as a potential problem than those who viewed pregnancy as a normal and well experience. The supportive nature of Latina interpersonal relationships may open doors for facilitating prenatal visits through the use of peer counseling, a tradition that is common in many Latin countries. Suggestions for health care providers working with Latina women include creating more caring clinic environments, vouchers for public transportation to clinics, using more female providers in clinics, attending to concerns of modesty, and public education regarding risk factors in pregnancy that cannot be identified without testing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleArgentine childbearing women living in Tucuman: Facilitators and barriers to prenatal careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158264-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Argentine childbearing women living in Tucuman: Facilitators and barriers to prenatal care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Coverston, Catherine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 544 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602-5544, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801.422.5613</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">catherine_coverston@byu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Tucman is one of the poorest, yet most populous provinces of Argentina. The public maternity hospital in Tucuman, which has about 14,000 births per year, has drawn the attention of UNICEF and the World Health Organization because it has one of this developing country=s highest infant and maternal mortality rates. The infant mortality rate has been estimated at between 20 and 40 per thousand births, while the maternal mortality rate is estimated at close to 100 per 100,000 births. The purpose of this research was to identify facilitators and barriers to prenatal care in the province of Tucuman. This had been targeted by local health care providers as a primary concern. Approximately 80% of women in the province receive either nor or inadequate prenatal care. Utilization of prenatal care is of concern in Latina populations throughout the Americas, including the United States, since culture and poverty combine to create barriers to that care. Latina women are also confident that they know how to care for themselves during pregnancy since in many Latin countries there is prestige associated with motherhood and these women take pride in being knowledgeable about childbearing. They frequently eschew prescribed prenatal care with the exception of technologic interventions such as ultrasound. A group of bilingual undergraduate faculty and students interviewed 18 women who had just given birth at the Maternity Hospital in Tucuman regarding barriers and facilitators to there prenatal care. The women had an excellent understanding of nutrition and lifestyle issues related to positive perinatal outcomes. Women who believed prenatal care would make a difference in outcomes managed to overcome poverty and other barriers such as transportation, embarrassment, and negative clinic experiences to access that care. The women who sought the most prenatal care experienced medical complications. Unfortunately, only a few of the women with uncomplicated pregnancies sought prenatal care. Those who did were more oriented to pregnancy as a potential problem than those who viewed pregnancy as a normal and well experience. The supportive nature of Latina interpersonal relationships may open doors for facilitating prenatal visits through the use of peer counseling, a tradition that is common in many Latin countries. Suggestions for health care providers working with Latina women include creating more caring clinic environments, vouchers for public transportation to clinics, using more female providers in clinics, attending to concerns of modesty, and public education regarding risk factors in pregnancy that cannot be identified without testing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:40:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:40:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.