2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158265
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physically Disabled College Age Women: Living Life To The Fullest
Abstract:
Physically Disabled College Age Women: Living Life To The Fullest
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Freeborn, Donna
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Clinical Instructor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 424 SWKT, PO Box 25424, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Contact Telephone:801.422.3507
Since passage of the 1992 American With Disabilities Act, awareness has increased regarding the needs of women with physical disabilities. National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiatives have identified the need for qualitative studies on the lived experiences of physically disabled women. A phenomenological study was conducted with college age young women with lifelong physical disabilities (cerebral palsy and spina bifida) attending a university in the western United States. In the initial audio-taped interviews, study participants were invited to share their perspectives on living with a lifetime mobility impairment. Subsequent interviews utilized a semi-structured open-ended interview guide to allow for clarification and discussion of health issues and other themes that arose during the initial interviews. Study participants identified both opportunities for growth and challenges in their lives, emphasizing living life to the fullest. The positives of growing up with a disability included learning to overcome challenges, gaining skills in standing up for themselves, and developing sensitivity and empathy for others. Social support and positive affirmation were important factors that contributed to their determination to succeed in the face of considerable challenges. Adolescence was a difficult and pivotal time as these women struggled with feelings of self worth and body image. As young women, they came to terms with the stark reality of life with a physical disability that included mobility impairment. Challenges included having others make stereotypical assumptions about them. They also described feeling a sense of mistrust about the motives of those who chose to befriend them. These women identified both positive and negative interactions with health care providers. They felt assumptions were made that they were asexual when providers did not offer counseling regarding birth control. They were seldom asked about intimate relationships or future plans for childbearing. The message they received was as disabled women they could not possibly have the same hopes and dreams as physically unimpaired "normal" women. Disabled women demonstrate body awareness, creative self-care practices, and have expertise in identifying their own health care needs. These women are the best sources of information about managing life with a disability. Documenting the personal health experiences of women living with disabilities facilitates these women "becoming visible." Sensitivity to their needs and the generation of strategies to address those needs is an important implication for nurses caring for women who are physically disabled.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysically Disabled College Age Women: Living Life To The Fullesten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158265-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physically Disabled College Age Women: Living Life To The Fullest</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Freeborn, Donna</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 424 SWKT, PO Box 25424, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801.422.3507</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">donna_freeborn@byu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Since passage of the 1992 American With Disabilities Act, awareness has increased regarding the needs of women with physical disabilities. National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiatives have identified the need for qualitative studies on the lived experiences of physically disabled women. A phenomenological study was conducted with college age young women with lifelong physical disabilities (cerebral palsy and spina bifida) attending a university in the western United States. In the initial audio-taped interviews, study participants were invited to share their perspectives on living with a lifetime mobility impairment. Subsequent interviews utilized a semi-structured open-ended interview guide to allow for clarification and discussion of health issues and other themes that arose during the initial interviews. Study participants identified both opportunities for growth and challenges in their lives, emphasizing living life to the fullest. The positives of growing up with a disability included learning to overcome challenges, gaining skills in standing up for themselves, and developing sensitivity and empathy for others. Social support and positive affirmation were important factors that contributed to their determination to succeed in the face of considerable challenges. Adolescence was a difficult and pivotal time as these women struggled with feelings of self worth and body image. As young women, they came to terms with the stark reality of life with a physical disability that included mobility impairment. Challenges included having others make stereotypical assumptions about them. They also described feeling a sense of mistrust about the motives of those who chose to befriend them. These women identified both positive and negative interactions with health care providers. They felt assumptions were made that they were asexual when providers did not offer counseling regarding birth control. They were seldom asked about intimate relationships or future plans for childbearing. The message they received was as disabled women they could not possibly have the same hopes and dreams as physically unimpaired &quot;normal&quot; women. Disabled women demonstrate body awareness, creative self-care practices, and have expertise in identifying their own health care needs. These women are the best sources of information about managing life with a disability. Documenting the personal health experiences of women living with disabilities facilitates these women &quot;becoming visible.&quot; Sensitivity to their needs and the generation of strategies to address those needs is an important implication for nurses caring for women who are physically disabled.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:40:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:40:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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