2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158267
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Risk reduction for hospitalized medical patients with substance abuse
Abstract:
Risk reduction for hospitalized medical patients with substance abuse
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Lopez-Bushnell, Kathy
P.I. Institution Name:University of New Mexico Hospital
Contact Address:931 Camino Ranchitos NW, Alburqueque, NM, 87114, USA
Contact Telephone:505.272.1959
Problem Statement: The contribution of patients' abuse of alcohol and other drugs to their physical and psychological illness has clearly been established. The pervasive use and abuse of alcohol and other psychoactive substances is considered to be the number one public health problem in the United States which contributes to morbidity and mortality more that any other single health problem. Alcohol and drug abuse contributes to the array of illnesses that necessitate admission to acute care settings. With an estimated cost of 10 million dollars and 40-50 percent of these individuals are self pay or un-insured. Based on previous studies there is a 16% readmission rate on this patient population. We currently do not have an effective nursing intervention or referral system for follow up outpatient substance abuse treatment. The majority of patients are discharged without adequate treatment or follow-up. Theoretical framework: The Roy Adaptation Model provided the framework for this research. The general principles of humanism and adaptation-level theory apply to this research. Description of the sample: The pilot study included all patients admitted to an acute care hospital medical unit who screen to be at risk for substance abuse. The research was conducted for a 6 month period. Methods: This pilot research study was a pre/post clinical intervention study that measured the affects of a substance abuse clinical pathway on hospitalized medicine patients. The procedures included training nurses in motivational interview techniques, screening all patients using the AUDIT, CAGE and the DAST tools, and obtaining informed consent on patients that screened positive. The clinical pathway order sheet was then placed on the chart of those patients who sign informed consent. The order sheet requested appropriate labs and referrals. Results: In a six-month pilot study, we found that 25% of the 849 patients admitted to an acute-care hospital screened positive for alcohol or drug abuse. The pre and post measurements included co-morbidity, number of re-admissions, provider satisfaction, patient satisfaction, length of stay, hospital discharge statistics, and number of referrals to outpatient substance abuse treatment. The majority of patients who screened positive for substance abuse were at risk for alcohol abuse. Conclusions: Over one fourth of patients admitted to a general acute hospital have a substance abuse problem which affects their health care. Nurses and physicians satisfaction scores improved after the MI intervention. Patients who signed the consent form had a lower number of hospital days and readmission to the hospital than those patients who did not sign the consent form. Nurses can provide an effective intervention for patients with substance abuse using motivational interviewing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRisk reduction for hospitalized medical patients with substance abuseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158267-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Risk reduction for hospitalized medical patients with substance abuse</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lopez-Bushnell, Kathy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of New Mexico Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">931 Camino Ranchitos NW, Alburqueque, NM, 87114, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">505.272.1959</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">klopezbushnell@salud.unm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Statement: The contribution of patients' abuse of alcohol and other drugs to their physical and psychological illness has clearly been established. The pervasive use and abuse of alcohol and other psychoactive substances is considered to be the number one public health problem in the United States which contributes to morbidity and mortality more that any other single health problem. Alcohol and drug abuse contributes to the array of illnesses that necessitate admission to acute care settings. With an estimated cost of 10 million dollars and 40-50 percent of these individuals are self pay or un-insured. Based on previous studies there is a 16% readmission rate on this patient population. We currently do not have an effective nursing intervention or referral system for follow up outpatient substance abuse treatment. The majority of patients are discharged without adequate treatment or follow-up. Theoretical framework: The Roy Adaptation Model provided the framework for this research. The general principles of humanism and adaptation-level theory apply to this research. Description of the sample: The pilot study included all patients admitted to an acute care hospital medical unit who screen to be at risk for substance abuse. The research was conducted for a 6 month period. Methods: This pilot research study was a pre/post clinical intervention study that measured the affects of a substance abuse clinical pathway on hospitalized medicine patients. The procedures included training nurses in motivational interview techniques, screening all patients using the AUDIT, CAGE and the DAST tools, and obtaining informed consent on patients that screened positive. The clinical pathway order sheet was then placed on the chart of those patients who sign informed consent. The order sheet requested appropriate labs and referrals. Results: In a six-month pilot study, we found that 25% of the 849 patients admitted to an acute-care hospital screened positive for alcohol or drug abuse. The pre and post measurements included co-morbidity, number of re-admissions, provider satisfaction, patient satisfaction, length of stay, hospital discharge statistics, and number of referrals to outpatient substance abuse treatment. The majority of patients who screened positive for substance abuse were at risk for alcohol abuse. Conclusions: Over one fourth of patients admitted to a general acute hospital have a substance abuse problem which affects their health care. Nurses and physicians satisfaction scores improved after the MI intervention. Patients who signed the consent form had a lower number of hospital days and readmission to the hospital than those patients who did not sign the consent form. Nurses can provide an effective intervention for patients with substance abuse using motivational interviewing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:40:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:40:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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