Symptom management of persons receiving end-of-life care in clinical facilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158270
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom management of persons receiving end-of-life care in clinical facilities
Abstract:
Symptom management of persons receiving end-of-life care in clinical facilities
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Torma, Linda
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Adjunct Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Missoula Campus MB2961, 32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812, Canada
Contact Telephone:406.243.2599
This study was a part of a larger study of one community's exploration in end-of-life care. The purpose of the study was to explore the family's experience and perception of the clinical management of symptoms of persons receiving end-of-life care in a variety of clinical settings. Conceptual framework: The framework used in this study was based on the foundational work of the Center to Improve Care of the Dying (CIDC), George Washington University, Washington, D.C. Sample: Participants were family members of 38 persons who died after being enrolled in a prospective study of persons with a serious illness receiving medical and nursing care in a variety of clinical settings. Methods: Participants completed the Family Retrospective Questionnaire 6-12 weeks after the death of the patients. The instrument was part of the "toolkit" recommended by the CIDC. Results: Seventy-one percent (71%) of the respondents felt that it was somewhat or very difficult for the patient to tolerate shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, fatigue, anxiety, depression, confusion, and pain. Fatigue was identified by families as the most frequent symptom (79%), the most severe symptom (71%), and the symptom causing more than a little distress to the patient (61%). Pain was identified as the symptom patients found most troubling (43%). Respondents noted that troubling symptoms were reported to the team if they were present, but only one-half of the respondents said that the physician talked with them about how the symptom would be treated during the last week (53%), talked about medicine in a way that they understood (61%) or, told them how it would be treated if it got worse (53%). Implications: The findings of this study support the awareness that troubling symptoms are being reported to the health care team but treatment planning for troubling symptoms with families appears inconsistent.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom management of persons receiving end-of-life care in clinical facilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158270-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptom management of persons receiving end-of-life care in clinical facilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Torma, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Missoula Campus MB2961, 32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406.243.2599</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ltorma@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study was a part of a larger study of one community's exploration in end-of-life care. The purpose of the study was to explore the family's experience and perception of the clinical management of symptoms of persons receiving end-of-life care in a variety of clinical settings. Conceptual framework: The framework used in this study was based on the foundational work of the Center to Improve Care of the Dying (CIDC), George Washington University, Washington, D.C. Sample: Participants were family members of 38 persons who died after being enrolled in a prospective study of persons with a serious illness receiving medical and nursing care in a variety of clinical settings. Methods: Participants completed the Family Retrospective Questionnaire 6-12 weeks after the death of the patients. The instrument was part of the &quot;toolkit&quot; recommended by the CIDC. Results: Seventy-one percent (71%) of the respondents felt that it was somewhat or very difficult for the patient to tolerate shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, fatigue, anxiety, depression, confusion, and pain. Fatigue was identified by families as the most frequent symptom (79%), the most severe symptom (71%), and the symptom causing more than a little distress to the patient (61%). Pain was identified as the symptom patients found most troubling (43%). Respondents noted that troubling symptoms were reported to the team if they were present, but only one-half of the respondents said that the physician talked with them about how the symptom would be treated during the last week (53%), talked about medicine in a way that they understood (61%) or, told them how it would be treated if it got worse (53%). Implications: The findings of this study support the awareness that troubling symptoms are being reported to the health care team but treatment planning for troubling symptoms with families appears inconsistent.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:40:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:40:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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