2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158271
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptoms and family caregiver response: The family members' perspective
Abstract:
Symptoms and family caregiver response: The family members' perspective
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Lee, Helen
P.I. Institution Name:Montana State University-Bozeman
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Missoula Campus MB2961, 32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812, Canada
Contact Telephone:406.243.2536
This study was a part of a larger study of one community's exploration in end-of-life care. The purpose of this baseline profile study was to examine the end-of-life experience through the perceptions of participants who had lived with and cared for a dying family member. As part of the dying experience, participants were asked about physical symptoms experienced by decedents during their illness and dying trajectory. For each physical symptom experienced, management of that symptom was explored. Theoretical/conceptual perspective: Qualitative inquiry was used as the philosophical perspective for conducting the study. The overall framework guiding the analysis of the interview data included concepts related to the dying experience, the caregiver experience, and satisfaction with the care of professional/agency caregivers. Symptoms were considered part of the dying experience while management of the symptoms was part of the dying and the caregiver experience. Sample: Forty-three family members (19 men & 24 women) living in a community of 50,000 persons in a western state participated in interviews about 38 decedents. Results: Pain was the most frequently mentioned single symptom experienced by the decedents. Changes in the ability of the decedents to care for themselves were cited as the next most difficult for caregivers. This multifaceted symptom included loss of mobility, getting dressed, hygiene and toileting, and eating. Other physical symptoms cited by participants included shortness of breath, drowsiness, urinary and bowel problems, loss of memory, and nausea and vomiting. When asked about management issues, some caregivers were matter-of-fact and stated "I just did it." However, many commented on the difficulty of watching their family member experience the symptom, of handling multiple symptoms and the increased intensity of symptoms toward the end of their decedents' dying trajectory. Also of concern was the coordination of care, particularly when the caregiver was holding a full time job and paid caregivers were providing care. Implications: The findings of the study displayed the need caregivers have for additional education about management of symptoms, particularly in the end stages of the dying trajectory, and support in coordinating care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptoms and family caregiver response: The family members' perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158271-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Symptoms and family caregiver response: The family members' perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Helen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Montana State University-Bozeman</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Missoula Campus MB2961, 32 Campus Drive #7416, Missoula, MT, 59812, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">406.243.2536</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hlee@montana.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study was a part of a larger study of one community's exploration in end-of-life care. The purpose of this baseline profile study was to examine the end-of-life experience through the perceptions of participants who had lived with and cared for a dying family member. As part of the dying experience, participants were asked about physical symptoms experienced by decedents during their illness and dying trajectory. For each physical symptom experienced, management of that symptom was explored. Theoretical/conceptual perspective: Qualitative inquiry was used as the philosophical perspective for conducting the study. The overall framework guiding the analysis of the interview data included concepts related to the dying experience, the caregiver experience, and satisfaction with the care of professional/agency caregivers. Symptoms were considered part of the dying experience while management of the symptoms was part of the dying and the caregiver experience. Sample: Forty-three family members (19 men &amp; 24 women) living in a community of 50,000 persons in a western state participated in interviews about 38 decedents. Results: Pain was the most frequently mentioned single symptom experienced by the decedents. Changes in the ability of the decedents to care for themselves were cited as the next most difficult for caregivers. This multifaceted symptom included loss of mobility, getting dressed, hygiene and toileting, and eating. Other physical symptoms cited by participants included shortness of breath, drowsiness, urinary and bowel problems, loss of memory, and nausea and vomiting. When asked about management issues, some caregivers were matter-of-fact and stated &quot;I just did it.&quot; However, many commented on the difficulty of watching their family member experience the symptom, of handling multiple symptoms and the increased intensity of symptoms toward the end of their decedents' dying trajectory. Also of concern was the coordination of care, particularly when the caregiver was holding a full time job and paid caregivers were providing care. Implications: The findings of the study displayed the need caregivers have for additional education about management of symptoms, particularly in the end stages of the dying trajectory, and support in coordinating care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:40:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:40:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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