2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158274
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Post-Surgical Pain Management Discharge Teaching: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
Post-Surgical Pain Management Discharge Teaching: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Reynolds, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:Idaho State University
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, Campus Box 8101, Pocatello, ID, 83209-8101, USA
Contact Telephone:208.282.2432
Purpose: To implement and evaluate a post-operative, pre-discharge patient education intervention that focuses on pain assessment, the importance of effective pain management, and specific techniques that can facilitate communication of pain needs after discharge with their health care provider. Specific Aims: This study examined the effectiveness of structured and focused patient pain education interventions on pain knowledge and attitudes, patient satisfaction, and self reported pain scores; compared two different pain education interventions with the current standard of practice; evaluated the effectiveness of techniques for improving communication skills; and explored the incidence of pain needs of discharged surgical patients. Outcomes of this study include pain knowledge and attitudes, patient satisfaction, and self reported pain scores. Description: Seventy post-surgical patients on an in-patient general surgical unit were randomly assigned to a control group C, or intervention group A or B. Demographics and a brief medical history were gathered and a pre-intervention Patient Pain Questionnaire (PPQ) was completed. All patients were given and instructed on how to use a pain log that included a self-reporting pain scale (0-10). Groups A and B then received a focused 10-15 minute, one-on-one patient education intervention that covered the topics of pain assessment and the importance of effective pain management. In addition, Group B received instructions on effective and assertive communication techniques. One week after discharge, subjects were mailed post-intervention PPQ and a brief pain inventory-short form (BPI) and asked to return by mail the questionnaires with their pain log. Findings: PPQ pre-test scores of the seventy initial participants reflected similar pain management barriers currently reported in the pain literature. Forty participants completed and returned by mail the follow-up questionnaires and pain log. There was no statistically significant difference between control Group C and intervention Groups A and B scores relative to pain scores, PPQ, and BPI scores. Data from all groups did support the presence of post-surgical pain after discharge. Of those participants still reporting pain after one week, more than fifty percent reported pain scores of greater than 6. Interestingly, the majority of these respondents were "satisfied" with their pain management. In addition, valuable data were generated by the pain log including types of pain medications being prescribed, frequency and response of medications taken, and alternative pain reducing techniques utilized by this group. Conclusions: Post-surgical patients do continue to have pain one week after discharge. The PPQ is an effective tool for identifying patient barriers to pain management and the patient pain log is a useful tool in assessing and evaluating post-operative pain management. The impact of patient education on post-surgical post discharge patients needs to be researched further. The results of this study are foundational in future pain management patient education research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePost-Surgical Pain Management Discharge Teaching: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158274-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Post-Surgical Pain Management Discharge Teaching: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Reynolds, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Idaho State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, Campus Box 8101, Pocatello, ID, 83209-8101, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">208.282.2432</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">reynmary@isu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To implement and evaluate a post-operative, pre-discharge patient education intervention that focuses on pain assessment, the importance of effective pain management, and specific techniques that can facilitate communication of pain needs after discharge with their health care provider. Specific Aims: This study examined the effectiveness of structured and focused patient pain education interventions on pain knowledge and attitudes, patient satisfaction, and self reported pain scores; compared two different pain education interventions with the current standard of practice; evaluated the effectiveness of techniques for improving communication skills; and explored the incidence of pain needs of discharged surgical patients. Outcomes of this study include pain knowledge and attitudes, patient satisfaction, and self reported pain scores. Description: Seventy post-surgical patients on an in-patient general surgical unit were randomly assigned to a control group C, or intervention group A or B. Demographics and a brief medical history were gathered and a pre-intervention Patient Pain Questionnaire (PPQ) was completed. All patients were given and instructed on how to use a pain log that included a self-reporting pain scale (0-10). Groups A and B then received a focused 10-15 minute, one-on-one patient education intervention that covered the topics of pain assessment and the importance of effective pain management. In addition, Group B received instructions on effective and assertive communication techniques. One week after discharge, subjects were mailed post-intervention PPQ and a brief pain inventory-short form (BPI) and asked to return by mail the questionnaires with their pain log. Findings: PPQ pre-test scores of the seventy initial participants reflected similar pain management barriers currently reported in the pain literature. Forty participants completed and returned by mail the follow-up questionnaires and pain log. There was no statistically significant difference between control Group C and intervention Groups A and B scores relative to pain scores, PPQ, and BPI scores. Data from all groups did support the presence of post-surgical pain after discharge. Of those participants still reporting pain after one week, more than fifty percent reported pain scores of greater than 6. Interestingly, the majority of these respondents were &quot;satisfied&quot; with their pain management. In addition, valuable data were generated by the pain log including types of pain medications being prescribed, frequency and response of medications taken, and alternative pain reducing techniques utilized by this group. Conclusions: Post-surgical patients do continue to have pain one week after discharge. The PPQ is an effective tool for identifying patient barriers to pain management and the patient pain log is a useful tool in assessing and evaluating post-operative pain management. The impact of patient education on post-surgical post discharge patients needs to be researched further. The results of this study are foundational in future pain management patient education research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:40:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:40:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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