Sleep and behavior in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and healthy children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158277
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep and behavior in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and healthy children
Abstract:
Sleep and behavior in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and healthy children
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Labyak, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA
Contact Telephone:206.543.8267
Problem: Children with JRA, regardless of disease severity, report poor sleep quality; however, little is known about the extent of disrupted sleep or its impact on daytime functioning. Disturbances in the circadian sleep-wake rhythm may be an important predictor of daytime sleepiness, poor performance, and behavioral problems in children at home and in school. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate daytime sleepiness and behavior in children with JRA and healthy controls. Sample: Participants included 30 children ages 6-12. Fourteen children (3 boys, 11 girls) diagnosed with polyarticular JRA were recruited from the rheumatology clinic, and 16 age/sex-matched healthy controls (4 boys, 12 girls) were recruited locally. Exclusion criteria included psychiatric illness, history of a major sleep disorder, or chronic illness from a non-arthritis condition. Methods: Children completed a sleep survey, answering questions about their sleep for the previous 2 weeks. Parents completed the Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ), a survey in which they recalled their child's sleep behavior over the previous 2 weeks (internal consistency =.68; test-retest reliability=.62-.79). Parents also completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) which measures the child's social behaviors and competence in activities and school performance (internal consistency=.93; test-retest reliability =.87-.89). Results: Children with JRA were more likely to report sleep disturbances. Fifty percent of the children with JRA reported difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep compared with 12.5% of the control children; 14.3% of the children with JRA reported falling asleep in an afternoon class compared with 0.0% of the control children. Seventy-nine percent of the children with JRA reported having nightmares or bad dreams compared with 37.5% of the controls. JRA children had higher total scores on the CSHQ (JRA= 44.3+1.2 and Control= 39.4+. 9, p<0.01) suggesting more disturbed sleep, and a higher frequency of parasomnias (e.g., sleep walking, night terrors; p<0.01). JRA subjects had higher "total"and "internalizing" behavior scores (p<0.01) on the CBCL, compared to healthy controls. Internalizing behaviors include withdrawn, somatic complaints, and anxious/depressed, while externalizing behaviors include delinquency and aggressiveness. Conclusions: Findings from this study suggest that children with JRA have more sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness than their healthy cohort-a finding that is corroborated by their parents who also report poor sleep quality in their children. Sleep disturbances may have a profound impact on daytime functioning and behavior. The results of this study and our previous work are building the foundation for the development of clinical interventions to enhance sleep quality in children with arthritic pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep and behavior in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and healthy childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158277-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sleep and behavior in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and healthy children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Labyak, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Box 357262, Seattle, WA, 98195-7262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">206.543.8267</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">slabyak@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Children with JRA, regardless of disease severity, report poor sleep quality; however, little is known about the extent of disrupted sleep or its impact on daytime functioning. Disturbances in the circadian sleep-wake rhythm may be an important predictor of daytime sleepiness, poor performance, and behavioral problems in children at home and in school. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate daytime sleepiness and behavior in children with JRA and healthy controls. Sample: Participants included 30 children ages 6-12. Fourteen children (3 boys, 11 girls) diagnosed with polyarticular JRA were recruited from the rheumatology clinic, and 16 age/sex-matched healthy controls (4 boys, 12 girls) were recruited locally. Exclusion criteria included psychiatric illness, history of a major sleep disorder, or chronic illness from a non-arthritis condition. Methods: Children completed a sleep survey, answering questions about their sleep for the previous 2 weeks. Parents completed the Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ), a survey in which they recalled their child's sleep behavior over the previous 2 weeks (internal consistency =.68; test-retest reliability=.62-.79). Parents also completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) which measures the child's social behaviors and competence in activities and school performance (internal consistency=.93; test-retest reliability =.87-.89). Results: Children with JRA were more likely to report sleep disturbances. Fifty percent of the children with JRA reported difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep compared with 12.5% of the control children; 14.3% of the children with JRA reported falling asleep in an afternoon class compared with 0.0% of the control children. Seventy-nine percent of the children with JRA reported having nightmares or bad dreams compared with 37.5% of the controls. JRA children had higher total scores on the CSHQ (JRA= 44.3+1.2 and Control= 39.4+. 9, p&lt;0.01) suggesting more disturbed sleep, and a higher frequency of parasomnias (e.g., sleep walking, night terrors; p&lt;0.01). JRA subjects had higher &quot;total&quot;and &quot;internalizing&quot; behavior scores (p&lt;0.01) on the CBCL, compared to healthy controls. Internalizing behaviors include withdrawn, somatic complaints, and anxious/depressed, while externalizing behaviors include delinquency and aggressiveness. Conclusions: Findings from this study suggest that children with JRA have more sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness than their healthy cohort-a finding that is corroborated by their parents who also report poor sleep quality in their children. Sleep disturbances may have a profound impact on daytime functioning and behavior. The results of this study and our previous work are building the foundation for the development of clinical interventions to enhance sleep quality in children with arthritic pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:41:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:41:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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