2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158279
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Agency, initiative, and obstacles to health among indigenous immigrant women
Abstract:
Agency, initiative, and obstacles to health among indigenous immigrant women
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:McGuire, Sharon,
P.I. Institution Name:University of San Diego
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Hahn School of Nursing, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA, 92110, USA
Contact Telephone:619.260.7526
The growing feminization and acceleration of the migration of ethnic indigenous women, such as Mixtecs, Zapotecs and Triquis, from the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca are creating new diasporas of ethnic indigenous Mexican people in the United States (U.S.), making it especially significant for nursing and the health professions. This qualitative study employed Dimensional Analysis to explore the migration and health experiences of indigenous Oaxacan immigrant/migrant women. Data collection using participant observation and interviewing occurred in Oaxaca, Mexico, along the US-Mexico border, and the interior of California. Findings revealed a high degree of agency in decisions to leave home, and initiative in attending to their own health needs and those of their families in culturally familiar venues. Undocumentedness emerged as a major barrier to seeking health care, as did language differences and the cultural milieu of health care agencies. A sequence of health seeking patterns emerged as creative ways to stay healthy or achieve healthy outcomes. Having legal documents expanded the repertoire of possibilities for health care access among women along the border but revealed equally seriously the dilemma of being a "persona non grata" if undocumented. Nursing practice with indigenous immigrants needs to be informed by knowledge of indigenous health practices, of the stresses and dangers of migration, of safety profiles of medications and herbs from Mexico, and of patterns of health seeking and knowing. Nursing praxis should be directed at the structural conditions that induce migration, the human rights situation along the border, and at collaborating with immigrant rights groups on issues of amnesty and changing the devastating consequences of the latest 1996 immigration law.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAgency, initiative, and obstacles to health among indigenous immigrant womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158279-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Agency, initiative, and obstacles to health among indigenous immigrant women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McGuire, Sharon, </td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of San Diego</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Hahn School of Nursing, 5998 Alcala Park, San Diego, CA, 92110, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">619.260.7526</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smcguire@sandiego.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The growing feminization and acceleration of the migration of ethnic indigenous women, such as Mixtecs, Zapotecs and Triquis, from the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca are creating new diasporas of ethnic indigenous Mexican people in the United States (U.S.), making it especially significant for nursing and the health professions. This qualitative study employed Dimensional Analysis to explore the migration and health experiences of indigenous Oaxacan immigrant/migrant women. Data collection using participant observation and interviewing occurred in Oaxaca, Mexico, along the US-Mexico border, and the interior of California. Findings revealed a high degree of agency in decisions to leave home, and initiative in attending to their own health needs and those of their families in culturally familiar venues. Undocumentedness emerged as a major barrier to seeking health care, as did language differences and the cultural milieu of health care agencies. A sequence of health seeking patterns emerged as creative ways to stay healthy or achieve healthy outcomes. Having legal documents expanded the repertoire of possibilities for health care access among women along the border but revealed equally seriously the dilemma of being a &quot;persona non grata&quot; if undocumented. Nursing practice with indigenous immigrants needs to be informed by knowledge of indigenous health practices, of the stresses and dangers of migration, of safety profiles of medications and herbs from Mexico, and of patterns of health seeking and knowing. Nursing praxis should be directed at the structural conditions that induce migration, the human rights situation along the border, and at collaborating with immigrant rights groups on issues of amnesty and changing the devastating consequences of the latest 1996 immigration law.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:41:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:41:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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