2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158280
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of a safety home visit intervention in a low-income community
Abstract:
Effects of a safety home visit intervention in a low-income community
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2002
Author:Hendrickson, Sherry, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Austin
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA
Contact Telephone:512.471.9079
Purpose: to explore relationships between Maternal Childhood Injury Health Belies (MCIHB) and Controllable Hazards Scale (CHS). The CHS is an in-home safety observation tool to evaluated hazards that mothers can modify. The purpose of this study was to: (a) identify barriers to safety behaviors, (b) increase maternal self-efficacy for safety behaviors, and (c) decrease home safety hazards. The sample consisted of 82 low-income mothers of children 1 to 5 years old from non-urban clinics. Conceptual Framework: The intervention based on the Health Belief Model, was conducted in Spanish and English depending on the preference of participants. The home visit featured teaching, identification of controllable hazards and barriers to self-efficacy for safety behaviors. Safety items were provided by the researcher, and then installed by mothers. The participant retention rate was 95%, with 78 mothers completing data collection at Time 2. Two research questions were posed: a) What is the difference in maternal health beliefs and controllable safety hazards between mothers of children aged 10 to 23 months and 24 to 47 months who do or do not receive a home visit intervention after controlling for the pretest? And b) What are the direct and indirect effects of the predictors variables on controllable safety hazards? Differences between pre and posttests for the MCIHB and CHS were tested with ANCOVA. Analyses used to identify predictors of CHS included bivariate and hierarchical regression. Significant bivariate relationships noted with CHS include: a) the number of children younger than 4 years old in the home; b) child age; c) home repair status; and d) marital status. Mothers with stronger safety self-efficacy and fewer perceived barriers had less accessible in-home hazards. Other predictors identified for CHS included never being married and housing repair needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of a safety home visit intervention in a low-income communityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158280-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of a safety home visit intervention in a low-income community</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hendrickson, Sherry, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Austin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">512.471.9079</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sherryh@mail.utexas.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: to explore relationships between Maternal Childhood Injury Health Belies (MCIHB) and Controllable Hazards Scale (CHS). The CHS is an in-home safety observation tool to evaluated hazards that mothers can modify. The purpose of this study was to: (a) identify barriers to safety behaviors, (b) increase maternal self-efficacy for safety behaviors, and (c) decrease home safety hazards. The sample consisted of 82 low-income mothers of children 1 to 5 years old from non-urban clinics. Conceptual Framework: The intervention based on the Health Belief Model, was conducted in Spanish and English depending on the preference of participants. The home visit featured teaching, identification of controllable hazards and barriers to self-efficacy for safety behaviors. Safety items were provided by the researcher, and then installed by mothers. The participant retention rate was 95%, with 78 mothers completing data collection at Time 2. Two research questions were posed: a) What is the difference in maternal health beliefs and controllable safety hazards between mothers of children aged 10 to 23 months and 24 to 47 months who do or do not receive a home visit intervention after controlling for the pretest? And b) What are the direct and indirect effects of the predictors variables on controllable safety hazards? Differences between pre and posttests for the MCIHB and CHS were tested with ANCOVA. Analyses used to identify predictors of CHS included bivariate and hierarchical regression. Significant bivariate relationships noted with CHS include: a) the number of children younger than 4 years old in the home; b) child age; c) home repair status; and d) marital status. Mothers with stronger safety self-efficacy and fewer perceived barriers had less accessible in-home hazards. Other predictors identified for CHS included never being married and housing repair needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:41:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:41:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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