2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158284
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of telephone advice on service utilization: A preliminary analysis
Abstract:
Impact of telephone advice on service utilization: A preliminary analysis
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Valanis, Barbara, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Center for Health Research Kaiser Permanente
Title:Senior Investigator
Contact Address:4610 SE Belmont, Portland, OR, 97215, USA
Contact Telephone:5032396746
Co-Authors:Tanner, C.; David, M.; Gullion, C.; Moscato, S.
Little has been reported in the literature on the extent to which telephone advice nursing actually reduces the use of other services such as visits to the emergency department, appointments, or follow-up phone calls. This report describes factors in an advice call that might be related to subsequent service utilization; examines whether advice service reduces the use of high-cost emergency room and urgency care services; and reports on whether the advised level of care was higher, lower, or the same as the patient would have used in the absence of advice service. The sample for this analysis is the 1965 callers to advice services in 4 regions of the country for whom we have data from the taped call and a questionnaire completed by the caller/patient. Overall, the satisfaction with the advice calls was high to very high ranging from 81% in the Northwest Region to 88% in Hawaii. The strongest predictor of satisfaction from the caller questionnaire was the perceived time on hold. Over half of the callers understood the advice to be the same as that on the taped call. Most callers (86.8%) reported that they followed all of the nurses’ advice, with another 9.8% indicating that they followed part of the advice. The use of advice service appears to decrease visits to the emergency room, urgency care and medical offices. Finally, about 75% of callers used a lower level of service, determined by comparing what callers would have done had advice services not been available with what the advice nurse advised them to do. Telephone advice nursing is well received by callers, who report high levels of satisfaction and follow through with advice. This finding, in conjunction with the finding that access to telephone advice nurses results in reductions in unnecessary urgent care/emergency visits suggests telephone advice nursing is a valuable resource for meeting both patient care and health system needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of telephone advice on service utilization: A preliminary analysisen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158284-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of telephone advice on service utilization: A preliminary analysis </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Valanis, Barbara, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Center for Health Research Kaiser Permanente</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Investigator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4610 SE Belmont, Portland, OR, 97215, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">5032396746</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tanner, C.; David, M.; Gullion, C.; Moscato, S. </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Little has been reported in the literature on the extent to which telephone advice nursing actually reduces the use of other services such as visits to the emergency department, appointments, or follow-up phone calls. This report describes factors in an advice call that might be related to subsequent service utilization; examines whether advice service reduces the use of high-cost emergency room and urgency care services; and reports on whether the advised level of care was higher, lower, or the same as the patient would have used in the absence of advice service. The sample for this analysis is the 1965 callers to advice services in 4 regions of the country for whom we have data from the taped call and a questionnaire completed by the caller/patient. Overall, the satisfaction with the advice calls was high to very high ranging from 81% in the Northwest Region to 88% in Hawaii. The strongest predictor of satisfaction from the caller questionnaire was the perceived time on hold. Over half of the callers understood the advice to be the same as that on the taped call. Most callers (86.8%) reported that they followed all of the nurses&rsquo; advice, with another 9.8% indicating that they followed part of the advice. The use of advice service appears to decrease visits to the emergency room, urgency care and medical offices. Finally, about 75% of callers used a lower level of service, determined by comparing what callers would have done had advice services not been available with what the advice nurse advised them to do. Telephone advice nursing is well received by callers, who report high levels of satisfaction and follow through with advice. This finding, in conjunction with the finding that access to telephone advice nurses results in reductions in unnecessary urgent care/emergency visits suggests telephone advice nursing is a valuable resource for meeting both patient care and health system needs. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:41:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:41:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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