2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158289
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's health and the impact of welfare reform
Abstract:
Women's health and the impact of welfare reform
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Drevdahl, Denise, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington, Nursing Program
Contact Address:1410 Campus Parkway, Tacoma, WA, 98402-3100, USA
Contact Telephone:2065432100
Co-Authors:Laakso, J.
The 1996 welfare reform legislation, resulting in a five-year life time eligibility for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families), has dramatically altered the pressures on single parents to leave welfare. Identifying obstacles to employment that impinge on single mothers' lives is crucial to understanding why some women may be unable to make a successful transition from welfare to work. Mothers and/or their children's health status may serve as an obstacle to gainful employment. One purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate health factors that hinder welfare recipients' successful exit from welfare within the 60-month time limit. This study uses a critical theory approach with a feminist orientation in recognition that gender is an important analytical category. The importance of understanding the problems of moving from welfare to work from the perspective of women's experiences is paramount. Critical social and feminist theories are helpful in examining the effects of social structures on women's lives. These perspectives are important as they offer critical insight to the underlying social contexts that contribute to the well being of the poor. Ethnographic methods-semi-structured interview with open-ended questions and probes provided-were used to collect the data. Mothers (n=38) on the Washington State WorkFirst program made up the study sample. The women ranged in age from 20 to 51; 71% were white, 21% were black, the remaining 6% were Native American, Hispanic, and Multi-racial. The mean monthly income for the women was $611. Data were analyzed with open coding and constant comparison. Major themes, key ideas, and questions were shared with participants (n=5) in a follow-up focus group as a means for validation of the analysis. Mothers participating in this study reported having numerous physical and mental health problems. These problems, including depression and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, often in association with abuse from parents or partners, as well as raising children with learning disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and other health issues created major obstacles to meeting stringent WorkFirst requirements. Mothers' stories of sanctions, poor living conditions, and difficulty obtaining appropriate health care demonstrates the need to reevaluate welfare policies and acknowledge the role health deficiencies play in recipients' efforts to leave welfare. As health care advocates, nurses must question the feasibility of current work requirements under these constraints and take the additional steps needed to provide low-income mothers with the appropriate resources and skills that address these health issues.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's health and the impact of welfare reformen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158289-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's health and the impact of welfare reform </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Drevdahl, Denise, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington, Nursing Program</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1410 Campus Parkway, Tacoma, WA, 98402-3100, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">2065432100</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">drevdahl@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Laakso, J. </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The 1996 welfare reform legislation, resulting in a five-year life time eligibility for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families), has dramatically altered the pressures on single parents to leave welfare. Identifying obstacles to employment that impinge on single mothers' lives is crucial to understanding why some women may be unable to make a successful transition from welfare to work. Mothers and/or their children's health status may serve as an obstacle to gainful employment. One purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate health factors that hinder welfare recipients' successful exit from welfare within the 60-month time limit. This study uses a critical theory approach with a feminist orientation in recognition that gender is an important analytical category. The importance of understanding the problems of moving from welfare to work from the perspective of women's experiences is paramount. Critical social and feminist theories are helpful in examining the effects of social structures on women's lives. These perspectives are important as they offer critical insight to the underlying social contexts that contribute to the well being of the poor. Ethnographic methods-semi-structured interview with open-ended questions and probes provided-were used to collect the data. Mothers (n=38) on the Washington State WorkFirst program made up the study sample. The women ranged in age from 20 to 51; 71% were white, 21% were black, the remaining 6% were Native American, Hispanic, and Multi-racial. The mean monthly income for the women was $611. Data were analyzed with open coding and constant comparison. Major themes, key ideas, and questions were shared with participants (n=5) in a follow-up focus group as a means for validation of the analysis. Mothers participating in this study reported having numerous physical and mental health problems. These problems, including depression and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, often in association with abuse from parents or partners, as well as raising children with learning disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and other health issues created major obstacles to meeting stringent WorkFirst requirements. Mothers' stories of sanctions, poor living conditions, and difficulty obtaining appropriate health care demonstrates the need to reevaluate welfare policies and acknowledge the role health deficiencies play in recipients' efforts to leave welfare. As health care advocates, nurses must question the feasibility of current work requirements under these constraints and take the additional steps needed to provide low-income mothers with the appropriate resources and skills that address these health issues.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:41:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:41:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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