2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158291
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescents’ Perception of Mothering
Abstract:
Adolescents’ Perception of Mothering
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Kenty, Janet
P.I. Institution Name:University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA, 02747-2300, USA
Contact Telephone:508.999.8194
Problem Statement: Although 890,000 teens become mothers each year and pregnant and parenting adolescents have been widely studied, there are few self-reports about teens’ mothering experience. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore and describe adolescents’ mothering experience and the challenges inherent in transitioning to motherhood. The study addressed the following research question: How do adolescents perceive their mothering experience? Theoretical Framework: Mercer’s (1985) stages of maternal role attainment provided a conceptual framework for this study. Sample: All first-time adolescent mothers enrolled in a school-based pregnant and parenting program were invited to participate if they spoke and understood English. Of the ten adolescents who met the inclusion criteria, six volunteered to participate and comprised the study sample. Participants’ ages ranged from 15 to 19 years. All of the teens had uncomplicated perinatal experiences and delivered healthy, term newborns by vaginal birth within the past nine months. Methods: To gather data for this qualitative study, a researcher-designed, semi-structured interview guide was used to explore and describe participants’ mothering experience. The interview guide begins with the general request, “Tell me about your experience as a new mother.” Four, broad, open-ended questions related to mothering then follow. Content and face validity of the interview guide were determined from the researcher’s experience, from salient issues identified in the literature, and from a review by two nursing research experts. This interview guide was refined after it was pilot tested on two adolescent mothers. Lasting approximately one hour, these interviews were audio-taped, and transcribed verbatim. Content analysis (Downe-Wamboldt, 1992) was used to analyze the data and to identify emergent themes. Findings: Four themes (Role Development, Life Changes, Acceptance of the Infant, and Regrets/Missed Opportunities) emerged from the data. For this sample of teens, the early mothering experience was more “like a dream” than a reality and transitioning to motherhood was extremely stressful. Gradually, teens learned to adapt to their mothering role, to accept and integrate their baby into their lives, and to describe their baby using both positive and negative terms. Conclusions: Findings offer insight into the complex phenomenon of teen mothering and have implications for nursing practice. A deeper understanding of adolescents’ mothering experience could heighten nurses’ sensitivity to the needs and concerns of young mothers. Findings also have implications for future research and the need to further explore the challenges inherent in adolescent mothering. By better understanding teen mothers and their challenges and rewards, nurses can take a leadership role in designing strategies aimed at better assisting these young mothers to mature as young adults and as parents.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescents’ Perception of Motheringen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158291-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescents&rsquo; Perception of Mothering </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kenty, Janet</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 285 Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA, 02747-2300, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">508.999.8194</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jrkenty@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Statement: Although 890,000 teens become mothers each year and pregnant and parenting adolescents have been widely studied, there are few self-reports about teens&rsquo; mothering experience. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore and describe adolescents&rsquo; mothering experience and the challenges inherent in transitioning to motherhood. The study addressed the following research question: How do adolescents perceive their mothering experience? Theoretical Framework: Mercer&rsquo;s (1985) stages of maternal role attainment provided a conceptual framework for this study. Sample: All first-time adolescent mothers enrolled in a school-based pregnant and parenting program were invited to participate if they spoke and understood English. Of the ten adolescents who met the inclusion criteria, six volunteered to participate and comprised the study sample. Participants&rsquo; ages ranged from 15 to 19 years. All of the teens had uncomplicated perinatal experiences and delivered healthy, term newborns by vaginal birth within the past nine months. Methods: To gather data for this qualitative study, a researcher-designed, semi-structured interview guide was used to explore and describe participants&rsquo; mothering experience. The interview guide begins with the general request, &ldquo;Tell me about your experience as a new mother.&rdquo; Four, broad, open-ended questions related to mothering then follow. Content and face validity of the interview guide were determined from the researcher&rsquo;s experience, from salient issues identified in the literature, and from a review by two nursing research experts. This interview guide was refined after it was pilot tested on two adolescent mothers. Lasting approximately one hour, these interviews were audio-taped, and transcribed verbatim. Content analysis (Downe-Wamboldt, 1992) was used to analyze the data and to identify emergent themes. Findings: Four themes (Role Development, Life Changes, Acceptance of the Infant, and Regrets/Missed Opportunities) emerged from the data. For this sample of teens, the early mothering experience was more &ldquo;like a dream&rdquo; than a reality and transitioning to motherhood was extremely stressful. Gradually, teens learned to adapt to their mothering role, to accept and integrate their baby into their lives, and to describe their baby using both positive and negative terms. Conclusions: Findings offer insight into the complex phenomenon of teen mothering and have implications for nursing practice. A deeper understanding of adolescents&rsquo; mothering experience could heighten nurses&rsquo; sensitivity to the needs and concerns of young mothers. Findings also have implications for future research and the need to further explore the challenges inherent in adolescent mothering. By better understanding teen mothers and their challenges and rewards, nurses can take a leadership role in designing strategies aimed at better assisting these young mothers to mature as young adults and as parents. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:41:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:41:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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