2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158296
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Video recruitment of low income mothers in a Hispanic community
Abstract:
Video recruitment of low income mothers in a Hispanic community
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Hendrickson, Sherry, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Austin
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA
Contact Telephone:512.471.9079
Project need/problem: Recruitment of underserved subjects begins to close the disparity gap evident among economically disadvantaged communities, and innovative approaches support this effort. Literacy, communication and credibility barriers often distance potential participants who are crucial to understanding methods to bridge these barriers. Undertaking: This presentation describes the evolution and creative use of a 4-minute recruitment video to invite Hispanic mothers in the target community. Community advisors collaborated on the script and narrate in English or in Spanish for a largely Mexican- population. Two local mothers describe the study on the video, along with the consent form, and the viewer sees the nurse, a stranger that asks to come into their homes, explain how their participation will help. As a token of appreciation, each child in the family receives a new book, and examples of colorful children’s books in English or Spanish are shown. The video demonstrates home safety items, provided by local vendors credited at the end, which mothers will be given as participants. In less than 4 minutes, potential subjects, some illiterate, have seen what they cannot read, and also whom they should expect at their door if they decide to participate. A research team member, most often an individual seen in the video, is available for questions after the viewing. Resulting outcome: A power analysis for a 2x2 ANCOVA (alpha = .05, power = .87, R² =. 36) determined a sample size of 40 mothers for each group (experimental and control) would be needed. A total of 82 women were recruited, and 78 women completed the study. Most mothers were Hispanic (87%); the remaining 13% were Caucasian. All but two were of Mexican descent. Spanish was the language preferred by 66% of the mothers. The average education level was 9th grade, and retention was 95%. Of the 4 mothers unable to complete the T2 data collection; three were in the experimental group and one was in the control group. Reasons for attrition included full-time employment (2 mothers), moving out of the country (1 mother), and death (1 mother). Conclusions, recommendations, & future considerations: Videotaped recruitment presentations provide a consistent message, and a visual image of study participants that viewers can relate to, from their community. The video may be the first step in establishing trust in the researcher and the study. Involving community advisors that can put the scripted ideas into their own words may produce a less than professional actor effect, yet potential recruits recognize themselves in these local participants. Future considerations include inviting recruits to critique the video, and to evaluate other methods that may be more effective. With sufficient refinement, an abbreviated version may be produced as a Public Service Announcement to increase awareness of community involvement and research goals or findings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVideo recruitment of low income mothers in a Hispanic communityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158296-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Video recruitment of low income mothers in a Hispanic community </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hendrickson, Sherry, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Austin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">512.471.9079</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sherryh@mail.utexas.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Project need/problem: Recruitment of underserved subjects begins to close the disparity gap evident among economically disadvantaged communities, and innovative approaches support this effort. Literacy, communication and credibility barriers often distance potential participants who are crucial to understanding methods to bridge these barriers. Undertaking: This presentation describes the evolution and creative use of a 4-minute recruitment video to invite Hispanic mothers in the target community. Community advisors collaborated on the script and narrate in English or in Spanish for a largely Mexican- population. Two local mothers describe the study on the video, along with the consent form, and the viewer sees the nurse, a stranger that asks to come into their homes, explain how their participation will help. As a token of appreciation, each child in the family receives a new book, and examples of colorful children&rsquo;s books in English or Spanish are shown. The video demonstrates home safety items, provided by local vendors credited at the end, which mothers will be given as participants. In less than 4 minutes, potential subjects, some illiterate, have seen what they cannot read, and also whom they should expect at their door if they decide to participate. A research team member, most often an individual seen in the video, is available for questions after the viewing. Resulting outcome: A power analysis for a 2x2 ANCOVA (alpha = .05, power = .87, R&sup2; =. 36) determined a sample size of 40 mothers for each group (experimental and control) would be needed. A total of 82 women were recruited, and 78 women completed the study. Most mothers were Hispanic (87%); the remaining 13% were Caucasian. All but two were of Mexican descent. Spanish was the language preferred by 66% of the mothers. The average education level was 9th grade, and retention was 95%. Of the 4 mothers unable to complete the T2 data collection; three were in the experimental group and one was in the control group. Reasons for attrition included full-time employment (2 mothers), moving out of the country (1 mother), and death (1 mother). Conclusions, recommendations, &amp; future considerations: Videotaped recruitment presentations provide a consistent message, and a visual image of study participants that viewers can relate to, from their community. The video may be the first step in establishing trust in the researcher and the study. Involving community advisors that can put the scripted ideas into their own words may produce a less than professional actor effect, yet potential recruits recognize themselves in these local participants. Future considerations include inviting recruits to critique the video, and to evaluate other methods that may be more effective. With sufficient refinement, an abbreviated version may be produced as a Public Service Announcement to increase awareness of community involvement and research goals or findings. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:42:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:42:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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