2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158297
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of home visits and use of safety items
Abstract:
Perceptions of home visits and use of safety items
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Hendrickson, Sherry, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Texas at Austin
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA
Contact Telephone:512.471.9079
Problem: Injury is the leading cause of death among children ages 1-5. Compromised pediatric access to basic health services, including injury prevention and safety promotion, results from environmental (sociopolitical, economic and geographic) and family barriers. In this study's target community, low income, largely Mexican and Mexican-American mothers of young children have language barriers, few sources of health education, and no source of local emergency care. This study addresses an under-researched area in public health, the long-term evaluation of a theoretically based intervention to reduce home hazards and increase efficacy for safety behaviors. Theoretical Framework: The Health Belief Model provided the framework for this study. The original randomized, controlled study explored relationships between maternal childhood injury health beliefs and controllable in-home hazards. Description of the sample: The sample consisted of 25 low-income women; able to be re-contacted from a previous study involving 78 subjects. Participants were mothers of 1 to 4 year old children, living in a small community adjacent to a metropolitan area in Texas. Hispanics represent the majority of residents, with 58% of children living in economically disadvantaged homes, a poverty rate unsurpassed in the county. Methods: This study describes follow-up phone interviews with 25 mothers who participated in safety home visits and who could be contacted 18-24 months after the original research. Within this descriptive research design, letters sent to all participants of the original study alerted mothers to a phone call for scheduling the interview and the specific questions to be posed. Interviews lasted approximately 15 - 20 minutes and with the participant's permission, 24 of the 25 interviews were audiotaped. Notes were taken during interviews with all participants. In hopes of increasing respondent frankness, interviewers were student research assistants trained by a research associate and the author. They provided a pre-established set of probes if respondents needed clarification of the questions. The research associate and author met periodically with the interviewers to monitor their progress and to answer any questions that had arisen. Techniques for qualitative data analysis proposed by Miles and Huberman are guiding analysis of these data. The strategies used in this study included noting themes, clustering, counting occurrence of themes, and making comparisons. The author is developing the initial codes based on the most common themes emerging from each question. To establish interrater reliability, another research team member is independently coding transcribed interviews. Research results: Coding refined, the frequency of responses will be computed for each coded category. Following the suggestions of Miles and Huberman20, the author constructed a series of tables depicting the frequency of response to each theme for each question category. Conclusions: Response patterns for identifiable subgroups of interviewees will be analyzed and compared. Major themes identified for each question will be discussed, followed by comparison of responses by participant characteristics, and frequency of safety item use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of home visits and use of safety itemsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158297-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perceptions of home visits and use of safety items </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hendrickson, Sherry, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Texas at Austin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1700 Red River, Austin, TX, 78701-1499, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">512.471.9079</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sherryh@mail.utexas.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem: Injury is the leading cause of death among children ages 1-5. Compromised pediatric access to basic health services, including injury prevention and safety promotion, results from environmental (sociopolitical, economic and geographic) and family barriers. In this study's target community, low income, largely Mexican and Mexican-American mothers of young children have language barriers, few sources of health education, and no source of local emergency care. This study addresses an under-researched area in public health, the long-term evaluation of a theoretically based intervention to reduce home hazards and increase efficacy for safety behaviors. Theoretical Framework: The Health Belief Model provided the framework for this study. The original randomized, controlled study explored relationships between maternal childhood injury health beliefs and controllable in-home hazards. Description of the sample: The sample consisted of 25 low-income women; able to be re-contacted from a previous study involving 78 subjects. Participants were mothers of 1 to 4 year old children, living in a small community adjacent to a metropolitan area in Texas. Hispanics represent the majority of residents, with 58% of children living in economically disadvantaged homes, a poverty rate unsurpassed in the county. Methods: This study describes follow-up phone interviews with 25 mothers who participated in safety home visits and who could be contacted 18-24 months after the original research. Within this descriptive research design, letters sent to all participants of the original study alerted mothers to a phone call for scheduling the interview and the specific questions to be posed. Interviews lasted approximately 15 - 20 minutes and with the participant's permission, 24 of the 25 interviews were audiotaped. Notes were taken during interviews with all participants. In hopes of increasing respondent frankness, interviewers were student research assistants trained by a research associate and the author. They provided a pre-established set of probes if respondents needed clarification of the questions. The research associate and author met periodically with the interviewers to monitor their progress and to answer any questions that had arisen. Techniques for qualitative data analysis proposed by Miles and Huberman are guiding analysis of these data. The strategies used in this study included noting themes, clustering, counting occurrence of themes, and making comparisons. The author is developing the initial codes based on the most common themes emerging from each question. To establish interrater reliability, another research team member is independently coding transcribed interviews. Research results: Coding refined, the frequency of responses will be computed for each coded category. Following the suggestions of Miles and Huberman20, the author constructed a series of tables depicting the frequency of response to each theme for each question category. Conclusions: Response patterns for identifiable subgroups of interviewees will be analyzed and compared. Major themes identified for each question will be discussed, followed by comparison of responses by participant characteristics, and frequency of safety item use. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:42:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:42:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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