2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158299
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationship between nurse-to-population ratio and county health indices
Abstract:
The relationship between nurse-to-population ratio and county health indices
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Bigbee, Jeri
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada-Reno, Orvis School of Nursing
Title:Professor
Contact Address:MS 134, Reno, NV, 89557, USA
Contact Telephone:775.784.6841
Statement of Need/Problem: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between nurse to population ratio and population health indices using counties as the unit of analysis. In light of the current nursing shortage this research is highly relevant in assessing the contribution of nursing professionals to the overall health of the population. In Nevada, a predominantly rural/frontier state which currently has the worst nurse to population ratio in the nation (520/100,000), this question is of particular importance. No previous studies have focused on the relationship of nurse to population ratio and population health indices, using counties as the unit of analysis. Theoretical Framework: Dever’s Epidemiological Model served as the conceptual framework for this study. Description of the Sample: The sample consisted of all counties in the state of Nevada (17), which includes 3 urban, 4 rural and 10 frontier counties. The population of the state is approximately 2 million people. Methods: A retrospective, non-experimental design was used. A secondary analysis was conducted, correlating current nurse to population data with county-based demographic and health status data. Results: The results indicated that nurse to population ratio was significantly correlated with the percentage of women obtaining prenatal care in the first trimester (r = .73, p<.005) and the accidental death rate (r = -.69, p<.005). County nurse to population ratio was not significantly related to self-reported health status, average life expectancy, age-adjusted death rate, number of sick days per year, or suicide rate, however the direction of all the correlation coefficients were supportive of nursing’s health promotive effect on populations. In light of these findings a follow-up comparative analysis of primary care physicians to population ratio in relation to all the same county health indices was conducted and revealed no significant relationships except with the number of sick days (r = .82, p<.005), suggesting that the more physicians in the community, the more sick days the residents experience. Conclusions: These findings, based on a relative small state population, suggest that nurses may produce a health promotive effect on the population, particularly in relation to early prenatal care and the prevention of accidental deaths. This tentative supposition is consistent with the health promotive and community-based focus of professional nursing. In rural states in which perinatal and trauma-related health issues are of particular concern, these findings are especially supportive of nurses’ contribution to the health of the population. Further research is needed using larger regional or national samples which would enabling the use of more powerful multivariate statistical measures to investigate the contribution of nurses to the health of communities in greater depth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationship between nurse-to-population ratio and county health indicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158299-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The relationship between nurse-to-population ratio and county health indices </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bigbee, Jeri</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada-Reno, Orvis School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MS 134, Reno, NV, 89557, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">775.784.6841</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbigbee@unr.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statement of Need/Problem: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between nurse to population ratio and population health indices using counties as the unit of analysis. In light of the current nursing shortage this research is highly relevant in assessing the contribution of nursing professionals to the overall health of the population. In Nevada, a predominantly rural/frontier state which currently has the worst nurse to population ratio in the nation (520/100,000), this question is of particular importance. No previous studies have focused on the relationship of nurse to population ratio and population health indices, using counties as the unit of analysis. Theoretical Framework: Dever&rsquo;s Epidemiological Model served as the conceptual framework for this study. Description of the Sample: The sample consisted of all counties in the state of Nevada (17), which includes 3 urban, 4 rural and 10 frontier counties. The population of the state is approximately 2 million people. Methods: A retrospective, non-experimental design was used. A secondary analysis was conducted, correlating current nurse to population data with county-based demographic and health status data. Results: The results indicated that nurse to population ratio was significantly correlated with the percentage of women obtaining prenatal care in the first trimester (r = .73, p&lt;.005) and the accidental death rate (r = -.69, p&lt;.005). County nurse to population ratio was not significantly related to self-reported health status, average life expectancy, age-adjusted death rate, number of sick days per year, or suicide rate, however the direction of all the correlation coefficients were supportive of nursing&rsquo;s health promotive effect on populations. In light of these findings a follow-up comparative analysis of primary care physicians to population ratio in relation to all the same county health indices was conducted and revealed no significant relationships except with the number of sick days (r = .82, p&lt;.005), suggesting that the more physicians in the community, the more sick days the residents experience. Conclusions: These findings, based on a relative small state population, suggest that nurses may produce a health promotive effect on the population, particularly in relation to early prenatal care and the prevention of accidental deaths. This tentative supposition is consistent with the health promotive and community-based focus of professional nursing. In rural states in which perinatal and trauma-related health issues are of particular concern, these findings are especially supportive of nurses&rsquo; contribution to the health of the population. Further research is needed using larger regional or national samples which would enabling the use of more powerful multivariate statistical measures to investigate the contribution of nurses to the health of communities in greater depth.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:42:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:42:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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