2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158300
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Chinese parenting styles and children’s health
Abstract:
Chinese parenting styles and children’s health
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Chen, Jyu-Lin
P.I. Institution Name:University of California-San Francisco, Department of Family Health Care Nursing
Title:Postgraduate Researcher
Contact Address:2 Koret Way, Box 0606, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0606, USA
Contact Telephone:415.502.6015
Co-Authors:Kennedy, C.
Parents play an important role in their child’s life. Studies in the Western literature have shown a negative relationship between parenting style and children’s physiological and psychosocial well-being and their health. A cross-sectional study design was utilized to examine Chinese parenting styles, factors associated with parenting styles and the degree to which parenting style contributed to children’s body composition in Taiwan and the U.S. The Family-Collaborative Ecosystemic Model (FEM), a model that incorporates concepts of health from Eastern and Western cultures was used as a framework for this study. A total sample of 163 children (age 8 to 10) and their mothers were enrolled in the study (Taiwan N=95; U.S N=68). Mothers in both countries completed basic demographic information, the Family Assessment Device (FAD), and Attitudes Toward Child Rearing Scale (ATCRS). The body mass index (BMI) was used to measure children’s body composition. Children also filled out a self-administrated physical activity checklist (SAPAC), Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and the Schoolagers’ Coping Strategies Inventory (SCSI). Multiple linear regression using a stepwise hierarchical model was used to examine the relationship between independent variable and the dependent variable of BMI. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to examine the relationship between parenting styles and family dynamics. Results indicated that no difference was found in ATCRS mean score between Chinese parents in Taiwan and those in the U.S (Taiwan mean=2.36, SD=.26; U.S mean= 2.37, SD=.24). Factors associated with ATCRS were FAD problem solving subscale (r=.203, p=.009) and FAD communication subscale (r=.196, p=.012). Multiple regressions indicated five variables significantly contributed to the variance in children’s BMI: older age (10%), being a boy (5.8%), more democratic parenting style (7.4%), poorer communication (8.4%), and poorer behavior control (3%). The model as a whole explained 27.9% of the variance (R²=.279, F=11.39, p=.0001). This study revealed that more democratic parenting style contributed to higher BMI in children. In addition to democratic parenting styles, older male children with poorer family communication and behavior control are also at risk for higher BMI. The mean ATCRS scores in this study suggested that Chinese parents, both in Taiwan and the U.S, utilized both authoritarian and democratic parenting, albeit most research suggested that Chinese parents tend to use more authoritarian parenting than Anglo parents. Poorer family functioning especially in problem solving and communication areas was associated with more authoritarian parenting style. Families with clear communication, adequate behavior control and structured parenting help to regulate a child’s health behavior. Thus, improving family functioning and parenting practices may help improve children’s health and maintain healthy weight.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChinese parenting styles and children’s healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158300-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Chinese parenting styles and children&rsquo;s health </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Jyu-Lin</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California-San Francisco, Department of Family Health Care Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postgraduate Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2 Koret Way, Box 0606, San Francisco, CA, 94143-0606, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">415.502.6015</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jyu-lin.chen@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kennedy, C. </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Parents play an important role in their child&rsquo;s life. Studies in the Western literature have shown a negative relationship between parenting style and children&rsquo;s physiological and psychosocial well-being and their health. A cross-sectional study design was utilized to examine Chinese parenting styles, factors associated with parenting styles and the degree to which parenting style contributed to children&rsquo;s body composition in Taiwan and the U.S. The Family-Collaborative Ecosystemic Model (FEM), a model that incorporates concepts of health from Eastern and Western cultures was used as a framework for this study. A total sample of 163 children (age 8 to 10) and their mothers were enrolled in the study (Taiwan N=95; U.S N=68). Mothers in both countries completed basic demographic information, the Family Assessment Device (FAD), and Attitudes Toward Child Rearing Scale (ATCRS). The body mass index (BMI) was used to measure children&rsquo;s body composition. Children also filled out a self-administrated physical activity checklist (SAPAC), Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and the Schoolagers&rsquo; Coping Strategies Inventory (SCSI). Multiple linear regression using a stepwise hierarchical model was used to examine the relationship between independent variable and the dependent variable of BMI. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to examine the relationship between parenting styles and family dynamics. Results indicated that no difference was found in ATCRS mean score between Chinese parents in Taiwan and those in the U.S (Taiwan mean=2.36, SD=.26; U.S mean= 2.37, SD=.24). Factors associated with ATCRS were FAD problem solving subscale (r=.203, p=.009) and FAD communication subscale (r=.196, p=.012). Multiple regressions indicated five variables significantly contributed to the variance in children&rsquo;s BMI: older age (10%), being a boy (5.8%), more democratic parenting style (7.4%), poorer communication (8.4%), and poorer behavior control (3%). The model as a whole explained 27.9% of the variance (R&sup2;=.279, F=11.39, p=.0001). This study revealed that more democratic parenting style contributed to higher BMI in children. In addition to democratic parenting styles, older male children with poorer family communication and behavior control are also at risk for higher BMI. The mean ATCRS scores in this study suggested that Chinese parents, both in Taiwan and the U.S, utilized both authoritarian and democratic parenting, albeit most research suggested that Chinese parents tend to use more authoritarian parenting than Anglo parents. Poorer family functioning especially in problem solving and communication areas was associated with more authoritarian parenting style. Families with clear communication, adequate behavior control and structured parenting help to regulate a child&rsquo;s health behavior. Thus, improving family functioning and parenting practices may help improve children&rsquo;s health and maintain healthy weight.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:42:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:42:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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