2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158301
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relaxation and Guided Imagery Lower Distress in Pregnant Latina Women?
Abstract:
Relaxation and Guided Imagery Lower Distress in Pregnant Latina Women?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:cohen, joan
Statement of the problem: Preterm birth accounts for up to 75% of perinatal morbidity and mortality and is on the rise. For Latina women living in the United States, the preterm birth rate in 1999-2000 was 11.2%, considerably above the Healthy People 2010 objective of 7.6%. High levels of psychologic distress during pregnancy have been identified as a risk factor leading to shorter gestational age at birth. Relaxation and guided imagery have been shown to decrease distress in middle class, white populations. The question in this study was whether this intervention could be adapted to effectively decrease distress in a low income Latina population. Both physiologic and psychologic measures were taken to determine the effectiveness of the intervention on reducing distress. Theoretical framework: Three theories guide the conceptual framework of this study: Selye’s General Adaptation Syndrome, Lazarus and Folkman’s Stress and Coping theory, and Benson’s Relaxation Response. Sample and Sampling: Pregnant Latina women (n = 38) with high levels of distress and low medical risk were recruited from the Prenatal Clinic at the Harbor-UCLA Research and Education Institute. Women who scored above the mean on at least two psychologic stress scales, Spielbeger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and/or the Pregnancy Anxiety Scale (PA), were invited to participate. Design: A pretest-posttest repeated measure experimental design was used. Procedure: Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Intervention group mothers participated in a six-week stress reduction program offered during the second trimester. The intervention was presented in Spanish and consisted of group sessions that included short lectures, opportunities to practice relaxation and guided imagery exercises, discussion, and audiotapes for home use. The guided imagery scripts and tapes were developed following focus group interviews with Latinas and focused on images of family, rather than places of solitude. In addition, the relaxation exercises were adapted to fit into daily living activities. Resources were provided for child care and transportation when necessary. Physiologic data (saliva and blood specimens) and psychologic data (STAI, PSS, PA) were collected at four time points. Findings: Although statistically significant differences between the groups was not reached, a consistent trend was observed. During the latter part of the second trimester and early third trimester, both physiologic and psychologic levels of distress decreased for the intervention group mothers. There was a positive association between a greater dose of intervention and a decrease in distress. Conclusions: Consistent participation in a stress reduction program during pregnancy may contribute to important reductions in physiologic and psychologic levels of distress, and may improve birth outcomes. For low income Latina women, sensitivity and knowledge of language and culture were key to the successful adaptation of this intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelaxation and Guided Imagery Lower Distress in Pregnant Latina Women?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158301-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relaxation and Guided Imagery Lower Distress in Pregnant Latina Women? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">cohen, joan</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bruinjoni@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statement of the problem: Preterm birth accounts for up to 75% of perinatal morbidity and mortality and is on the rise. For Latina women living in the United States, the preterm birth rate in 1999-2000 was 11.2%, considerably above the Healthy People 2010 objective of 7.6%. High levels of psychologic distress during pregnancy have been identified as a risk factor leading to shorter gestational age at birth. Relaxation and guided imagery have been shown to decrease distress in middle class, white populations. The question in this study was whether this intervention could be adapted to effectively decrease distress in a low income Latina population. Both physiologic and psychologic measures were taken to determine the effectiveness of the intervention on reducing distress. Theoretical framework: Three theories guide the conceptual framework of this study: Selye&rsquo;s General Adaptation Syndrome, Lazarus and Folkman&rsquo;s Stress and Coping theory, and Benson&rsquo;s Relaxation Response. Sample and Sampling: Pregnant Latina women (n = 38) with high levels of distress and low medical risk were recruited from the Prenatal Clinic at the Harbor-UCLA Research and Education Institute. Women who scored above the mean on at least two psychologic stress scales, Spielbeger&rsquo;s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and/or the Pregnancy Anxiety Scale (PA), were invited to participate. Design: A pretest-posttest repeated measure experimental design was used. Procedure: Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Intervention group mothers participated in a six-week stress reduction program offered during the second trimester. The intervention was presented in Spanish and consisted of group sessions that included short lectures, opportunities to practice relaxation and guided imagery exercises, discussion, and audiotapes for home use. The guided imagery scripts and tapes were developed following focus group interviews with Latinas and focused on images of family, rather than places of solitude. In addition, the relaxation exercises were adapted to fit into daily living activities. Resources were provided for child care and transportation when necessary. Physiologic data (saliva and blood specimens) and psychologic data (STAI, PSS, PA) were collected at four time points. Findings: Although statistically significant differences between the groups was not reached, a consistent trend was observed. During the latter part of the second trimester and early third trimester, both physiologic and psychologic levels of distress decreased for the intervention group mothers. There was a positive association between a greater dose of intervention and a decrease in distress. Conclusions: Consistent participation in a stress reduction program during pregnancy may contribute to important reductions in physiologic and psychologic levels of distress, and may improve birth outcomes. For low income Latina women, sensitivity and knowledge of language and culture were key to the successful adaptation of this intervention. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:42:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:42:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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