2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158303
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies for analyzing interventions: Trajectories in irritable infants
Abstract:
Strategies for analyzing interventions: Trajectories in irritable infants
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Dudley, William
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah, College of Nursing
Title:Research Professor
Contact Address:10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA
Contact Telephone:801.587.7866
Co-Authors:Keefe, Maureen R.; Benuzillo, J. G.
Statement of the Problem: Irritable infants have been described as having difficulty getting to sleep, being more easily disturbed, and spending less time in quiet sleep than non-irritable infants. A barrier to the study of sleep patterns in infants is the difficulty in capturing and analyzing data acquired from infant state monitoring systems. A new computer program has been developed which employs a sensor mattress and modified ambulatory cardiac monitor. An algorithm based program was developed to categorize the data into infant behavioral states. Design and Framework: This federally-funded randomized clinical trial was designed to develop and test a theoretically based intervention known as the REST Routine. This home-based intervention program guides practitioners working with families with irritable infants. The study employed a repeated measure, experimental longitudinal design in a two-site clinical trial. The data collection sites were the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston and the Children’s Hospital in Denver, Colorado. Infant irritability is conceptualized as a developmental; behavior disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of unexplained crying, inability to fall asleep, and increased sensitivity to stimuli. Four concepts form the basis of the REST routine and guide the intervention for the infants and the parents. Description of the Sample: 164 healthy full-term infants between the ages of 2 to 6 weeks were recruited and retained into the study. Forty six families were from the Charleston, S.C. area and 118 families were from the Denver metropolitan area. Participants were predominately Caucasian middle, upper income families. Mean age of the infant at time of entry into the randomized clinical trial was 4.7 weeks and the mean level of crying was 5.6 hours per day. Methods: The following four primary outcome measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention program: 1) amount of infant crying over 8 weeks, 2) level of parenting distress, 3) quality of mother-infant interaction and 4) stability of infant sleep wake patterns. The focus of the presentation will be on the first outcome measure, the amount of infant crying over time. Research Results: Analysis of the effect of the REST regimen on unexplained crying was conducted using SAS version 8.2. The analysis of crying using proc MIXED showed a significant time by treatment effect (p = .02). Analyses of proportion of infants with resolved crying using proc GENMOD showed a significant time by treatment effect (p = .003). Individual curve analyses of unexplained crying showed significant linear and quadratic terms (p < .001 in both cases). Additional analyses of correlates of change will be discussed and the effect of the intervention will be demonstrated using these various analytic approaches. The presentation will focus on recent advances in statistical methods which may prove useful for designing, implementing, and analyzing the effect of an intervention in a situation in which developmental changes over time are also present.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies for analyzing interventions: Trajectories in irritable infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158303-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strategies for analyzing interventions: Trajectories in irritable infants </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dudley, William</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801.587.7866</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">william.dudley@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Keefe, Maureen R.; Benuzillo, J. G. </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statement of the Problem: Irritable infants have been described as having difficulty getting to sleep, being more easily disturbed, and spending less time in quiet sleep than non-irritable infants. A barrier to the study of sleep patterns in infants is the difficulty in capturing and analyzing data acquired from infant state monitoring systems. A new computer program has been developed which employs a sensor mattress and modified ambulatory cardiac monitor. An algorithm based program was developed to categorize the data into infant behavioral states. Design and Framework: This federally-funded randomized clinical trial was designed to develop and test a theoretically based intervention known as the REST Routine. This home-based intervention program guides practitioners working with families with irritable infants. The study employed a repeated measure, experimental longitudinal design in a two-site clinical trial. The data collection sites were the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston and the Children&rsquo;s Hospital in Denver, Colorado. Infant irritability is conceptualized as a developmental; behavior disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of unexplained crying, inability to fall asleep, and increased sensitivity to stimuli. Four concepts form the basis of the REST routine and guide the intervention for the infants and the parents. Description of the Sample: 164 healthy full-term infants between the ages of 2 to 6 weeks were recruited and retained into the study. Forty six families were from the Charleston, S.C. area and 118 families were from the Denver metropolitan area. Participants were predominately Caucasian middle, upper income families. Mean age of the infant at time of entry into the randomized clinical trial was 4.7 weeks and the mean level of crying was 5.6 hours per day. Methods: The following four primary outcome measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention program: 1) amount of infant crying over 8 weeks, 2) level of parenting distress, 3) quality of mother-infant interaction and 4) stability of infant sleep wake patterns. The focus of the presentation will be on the first outcome measure, the amount of infant crying over time. Research Results: Analysis of the effect of the REST regimen on unexplained crying was conducted using SAS version 8.2. The analysis of crying using proc MIXED showed a significant time by treatment effect (p = .02). Analyses of proportion of infants with resolved crying using proc GENMOD showed a significant time by treatment effect (p = .003). Individual curve analyses of unexplained crying showed significant linear and quadratic terms (p &lt; .001 in both cases). Additional analyses of correlates of change will be discussed and the effect of the intervention will be demonstrated using these various analytic approaches. The presentation will focus on recent advances in statistical methods which may prove useful for designing, implementing, and analyzing the effect of an intervention in a situation in which developmental changes over time are also present. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:42:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:42:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.