2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158304
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recognizing and managing violence in the neonatal intensive care unit
Abstract:
Recognizing and managing violence in the neonatal intensive care unit
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Early, Margaret
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada-Reno, Orvis School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:MS 134, Reno, NV, 89557-0052, USA
Contact Telephone:775.784.6841
Purpose: To build a database on workplace violence experienced by neonatal intensive care nurses by a) determining the nature and frequency of incidents and b) by soliciting information on nurses’ confidence to recognize and deal with threatening and violent situations. Conceptual foundation: Workplace violence directed at nurses is being addressed in the writings of but a few investigators. In addition to a paucity of data, numbers cited may be unreliable because of underreporting. Additionally, nurses may not have had training to equip them to recognize and proactively deal with individuals’ escalating behavior. Design: Descriptive, self-administered questionnaire. Sample: non-probability, 68 RNs employed in a Level 3 neonatal intensive care unit in a mid-western metropolitan area. Main outcome variables: Types of threatening or violent events N.I.C.U. nurses experience in the workplace; nurses’ confidence in recognizing and managing threatening and violent situations. Results: Fifty-six percent (n=36) of sample experienced threatening or violent workplace events. Seventy percent of the threatening or violent events reported were by co-workers. 83.8% (n=57) of the sample felt confident to recognize violent situations, and 69.1% (n=47) felt confident to manage violent situations. No relationship was found between completion of a hospital mandated, computer-based anti-violence training and confidence to manage threatening or violent situations (F=.034. df=1, p=1.0). Conclusions: Neonatal nurses may lack skills necessary to recognize escalating tension in clients’ families, themselves and their co-workers. A program of training that addresses the specific circumstances of the N.I.C.U. could be developed to insure the safety of clients and staff. While the mandatory anti-violence computer training may provide a general overview, it appears not to be as useful as intended in the neonatal intensive care unit.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecognizing and managing violence in the neonatal intensive care uniten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158304-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recognizing and managing violence in the neonatal intensive care unit </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Early, Margaret</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada-Reno, Orvis School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">MS 134, Reno, NV, 89557-0052, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">775.784.6841 </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mearly@unr.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To build a database on workplace violence experienced by neonatal intensive care nurses by a) determining the nature and frequency of incidents and b) by soliciting information on nurses&rsquo; confidence to recognize and deal with threatening and violent situations. Conceptual foundation: Workplace violence directed at nurses is being addressed in the writings of but a few investigators. In addition to a paucity of data, numbers cited may be unreliable because of underreporting. Additionally, nurses may not have had training to equip them to recognize and proactively deal with individuals&rsquo; escalating behavior. Design: Descriptive, self-administered questionnaire. Sample: non-probability, 68 RNs employed in a Level 3 neonatal intensive care unit in a mid-western metropolitan area. Main outcome variables: Types of threatening or violent events N.I.C.U. nurses experience in the workplace; nurses&rsquo; confidence in recognizing and managing threatening and violent situations. Results: Fifty-six percent (n=36) of sample experienced threatening or violent workplace events. Seventy percent of the threatening or violent events reported were by co-workers. 83.8% (n=57) of the sample felt confident to recognize violent situations, and 69.1% (n=47) felt confident to manage violent situations. No relationship was found between completion of a hospital mandated, computer-based anti-violence training and confidence to manage threatening or violent situations (F=.034. df=1, p=1.0). Conclusions: Neonatal nurses may lack skills necessary to recognize escalating tension in clients&rsquo; families, themselves and their co-workers. A program of training that addresses the specific circumstances of the N.I.C.U. could be developed to insure the safety of clients and staff. While the mandatory anti-violence computer training may provide a general overview, it appears not to be as useful as intended in the neonatal intensive care unit. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:42:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:42:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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