2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158306
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Connecting in Cyberspace: Relationship Development in an E-Support Group
Abstract:
Connecting in Cyberspace: Relationship Development in an E-Support Group
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Hrabe, David
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PO Box 873008, Tempe, AZ, 85287-3008, USA
Contact Telephone:480.965.7432
Need and Purpose: The continuing explosion of the Internet creates a variety of new opportunities to practice nursing. An unexplored aspect of communication via the World Wide Web is how health care relationships evolve in this new context. The arrival of computer-mediated communication (CMC) on the health care scene requires a close examination of its effect upon interpersonal communication. The purpose of this study was to determine the stages and processes of relationship development in a computer-mediated support group. Specific questions generating this study were: 1. How do support group relationships develop when using computer-mediated communication? 2. What processes support relationship development? 3. What stages in development occur over time? Theoretical Framework: Social Information Processing Theory (Walther) formed the theoretical basis for concluding that social information is exchanged in an electronic environment. This allowed for the assumption that social processes occur and are identifiable in a computer-mediated support group. Grounded theory methodology’s theoretical basis is symbolic interactionism was complementary to Walther’s work. Study Sample: The study sample consisted of textual messages exchanged among 15 chronically ill women in an electronic support group. The group was participating in a study that focused on social support related to chronic illness from which the textual messages were derived. The women were aged 37 to 61 years. Twelve were Caucasian and three were Native American. Most were married (n=12) with the remainder divorced (n=2), separated (n=1) or never married (n=1). The group’s years of education ranged from 10 to 20. Regarding chronic illness, three participants of the group were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, five with diabetes, four with a rheumatoid disease and three with cancer. Years of symptom onset ranged from 2 to 35 years, with official diagnosis ranging from 26 years to less than one year. Method: Using grounded theory methodology, a secondary data analysis was conducted of 22 weeks of textual message exchanges among the women in the study sample. Atlas.ti was used to organize the voluminous textual data for analysis by the investigator. Results: The study’s outcome is a new middle range theory, Connecting in Cyberspace. This theoretical framework is the first attempt to describe the processes and phases of a computer-mediated support group and is intended as a beginning guide for nursing practice in an electronic environment. Four phases of group development (Orienting, Intensifying, Integrating, and Concluding) with six relationship processes (Maintaining, Committing, Initiating, Responding, Grouping, and Terminating) were identified. Conclusion: The phases and processes of support group functioning found in this computer-mediated context closely mirror those of face-to-face encounters. The findings suggest that nurses may effectively facilitate support via computer-mediated communication to clients who are time or space bound.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConnecting in Cyberspace: Relationship Development in an E-Support Groupen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158306-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Connecting in Cyberspace: Relationship Development in an E-Support Group </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hrabe, David</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 873008, Tempe, AZ, 85287-3008, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">480.965.7432</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">david.hrabe@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Need and Purpose: The continuing explosion of the Internet creates a variety of new opportunities to practice nursing. An unexplored aspect of communication via the World Wide Web is how health care relationships evolve in this new context. The arrival of computer-mediated communication (CMC) on the health care scene requires a close examination of its effect upon interpersonal communication. The purpose of this study was to determine the stages and processes of relationship development in a computer-mediated support group. Specific questions generating this study were: 1. How do support group relationships develop when using computer-mediated communication? 2. What processes support relationship development? 3. What stages in development occur over time? Theoretical Framework: Social Information Processing Theory (Walther) formed the theoretical basis for concluding that social information is exchanged in an electronic environment. This allowed for the assumption that social processes occur and are identifiable in a computer-mediated support group. Grounded theory methodology&rsquo;s theoretical basis is symbolic interactionism was complementary to Walther&rsquo;s work. Study Sample: The study sample consisted of textual messages exchanged among 15 chronically ill women in an electronic support group. The group was participating in a study that focused on social support related to chronic illness from which the textual messages were derived. The women were aged 37 to 61 years. Twelve were Caucasian and three were Native American. Most were married (n=12) with the remainder divorced (n=2), separated (n=1) or never married (n=1). The group&rsquo;s years of education ranged from 10 to 20. Regarding chronic illness, three participants of the group were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, five with diabetes, four with a rheumatoid disease and three with cancer. Years of symptom onset ranged from 2 to 35 years, with official diagnosis ranging from 26 years to less than one year. Method: Using grounded theory methodology, a secondary data analysis was conducted of 22 weeks of textual message exchanges among the women in the study sample. Atlas.ti was used to organize the voluminous textual data for analysis by the investigator. Results: The study&rsquo;s outcome is a new middle range theory, Connecting in Cyberspace. This theoretical framework is the first attempt to describe the processes and phases of a computer-mediated support group and is intended as a beginning guide for nursing practice in an electronic environment. Four phases of group development (Orienting, Intensifying, Integrating, and Concluding) with six relationship processes (Maintaining, Committing, Initiating, Responding, Grouping, and Terminating) were identified. Conclusion: The phases and processes of support group functioning found in this computer-mediated context closely mirror those of face-to-face encounters. The findings suggest that nurses may effectively facilitate support via computer-mediated communication to clients who are time or space bound. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:42:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:42:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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