2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158307
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family caregiving experience among Chinese caregivers in the United States
Abstract:
Family caregiving experience among Chinese caregivers in the United States
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Hsueh, Kuei-Hsiang
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Arizona University, Department of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:PB Box 15035, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011-5035
Co-Authors:Cheng, W.
Asian Americans are the third largest minority group in the United States. Among the Asian immigrants, Chinese are the largest Asian population, consisting of 22.6 of all Asian immigrants (Statistical Bulletin, 1997). As the Chinese immigrant population is growing steadily, the Chinese elderly population will increase in the next decade. Consequently, issues related to family caregiving will become evident. This requirement is even more critical among Chinese, since, historically, the concept of filial piety, rooted in Confucianism, has been dominant. Understanding cultural factors that influence health problems relevant to Chinese family caregivers will present a challenge to health care providers in the years ahead. The purpose of study was to test a theoretical model specifying how the interrelationship of factors including subjective beliefs of traditional filial obligation, subjective feelings about role requirements, perceived burdens, perceived rewards and use of coping affect Chinese caregivers' health among in the United States. The aim of this study was to understand how caregivers' cultural background and the appraisal of family caregiving affect caregivers’ wellbeing. A descriptive design with the causal modeling approach was used to identify hypothesized causal relationships within a conceptual framework and to explore the effects of subjective beliefs of filial obligation on Chinese caregivers’ health. The sampling criteria are Chinese primary caregivers who (1) had carried primary responsibility for providing assistance with at least three activities of daily living to a family member over the age of 55, (2) had provided informal support to their family member for at least 3 months while the elder lived in the United States, and (3) were able to speak, read, and write adequate Chinese or English. Data from 137 caregivers were used to describe a sample profile and for model testing. Results show that the majority of the caregivers were mid-life, working daughters or daughters-in-law who provided care to frail elders with some type of chronic illnesses. Most caregivers were well educated and had a moderate to high economic status. The original model did not have a good fit with the data. Two revised models were developed based on the information given in the results of the original model testing. The first revised model, was determined as the best fitting model as indicated by CFI= .91 and the ?2 / df ratio = 2.9. The second revised model had a minimally acceptable good fit with the data as indicated by CFI= .90, however, it failed to meet the criterion for ?2 / df ratio test. In conclusion, the best fitting model suggests caregivers' beliefs of traditional filial obligation is a primary predictor for caregivers' physical health. Caregivers’ subjective beliefs of traditional filial obligation affect caregivers’ physical health not only directly but also indirectly.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily caregiving experience among Chinese caregivers in the United Statesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158307-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family caregiving experience among Chinese caregivers in the United States </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hsueh, Kuei-Hsiang</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Arizona University, Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PB Box 15035, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011-5035</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheng, W. </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Asian Americans are the third largest minority group in the United States. Among the Asian immigrants, Chinese are the largest Asian population, consisting of 22.6 of all Asian immigrants (Statistical Bulletin, 1997). As the Chinese immigrant population is growing steadily, the Chinese elderly population will increase in the next decade. Consequently, issues related to family caregiving will become evident. This requirement is even more critical among Chinese, since, historically, the concept of filial piety, rooted in Confucianism, has been dominant. Understanding cultural factors that influence health problems relevant to Chinese family caregivers will present a challenge to health care providers in the years ahead. The purpose of study was to test a theoretical model specifying how the interrelationship of factors including subjective beliefs of traditional filial obligation, subjective feelings about role requirements, perceived burdens, perceived rewards and use of coping affect Chinese caregivers' health among in the United States. The aim of this study was to understand how caregivers' cultural background and the appraisal of family caregiving affect caregivers&rsquo; wellbeing. A descriptive design with the causal modeling approach was used to identify hypothesized causal relationships within a conceptual framework and to explore the effects of subjective beliefs of filial obligation on Chinese caregivers&rsquo; health. The sampling criteria are Chinese primary caregivers who (1) had carried primary responsibility for providing assistance with at least three activities of daily living to a family member over the age of 55, (2) had provided informal support to their family member for at least 3 months while the elder lived in the United States, and (3) were able to speak, read, and write adequate Chinese or English. Data from 137 caregivers were used to describe a sample profile and for model testing. Results show that the majority of the caregivers were mid-life, working daughters or daughters-in-law who provided care to frail elders with some type of chronic illnesses. Most caregivers were well educated and had a moderate to high economic status. The original model did not have a good fit with the data. Two revised models were developed based on the information given in the results of the original model testing. The first revised model, was determined as the best fitting model as indicated by CFI= .91 and the ?2 / df ratio = 2.9. The second revised model had a minimally acceptable good fit with the data as indicated by CFI= .90, however, it failed to meet the criterion for ?2 / df ratio test. In conclusion, the best fitting model suggests caregivers' beliefs of traditional filial obligation is a primary predictor for caregivers' physical health. Caregivers&rsquo; subjective beliefs of traditional filial obligation affect caregivers&rsquo; physical health not only directly but also indirectly. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:42:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:42:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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