2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158308
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Incidence of infection for preterm twins cared for in cobedding in the NICU
Abstract:
Incidence of infection for preterm twins cared for in cobedding in the NICU
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:LaMar, Kim
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University, College of Nursing
Title:Faculty
Contact Address:Community Services Building, 200 East Curry Road, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA
Statement of the problem: The introduction of cobedding of twins in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has led to much controversy. Although twins only account for 2% of all births, the risk of low birthweight is seven times higher and low birthweight twins account for 12% of all infant deaths. In addition, the Reproductive Statistics Bureau reports the number of twin births has increased over the past fifteen years by 42%. Preterm twins are immunocompromised and at risk for sepsis related to poor skin integrity, decreased innate immunity, invasive lines and the hostile bacterial environment of the neonatal intensive care unit. Sepsis plays a significant role in neonatal morbidity and warrants a close examination of practices that may have a relationship between this vulnerable population and sepsis. Research design: This study was a retrospective descriptive design utilizing chart review to compare the infectious risk for preterm twins cared for in cobedding with preterm twins cared for in separate beds over a ten year period. This study was a precursor for a prospective design by the author that is ongoing at a university tertiary center. Sample: A convenience sample of preterm twin infants less than 35 weeks were studied. Names were obtained through a unit census book that records all admissions to the NICU from 1992 through 2001. Methods: The setting was a tertiary center in the United States. Twins were systematically matched into two cohorts, those who were cared for in cobedding and those cared for in separate beds, based on gestational age at birth. The outcome measure was the percentage of preterm twin infants developing an infection while in cobedding as compared to the preterm twin infants not in cobedding as evidenced by culture and/or radiograph results. Other measures will include length of stay, reasons for separation of twins, feeding patterns, respiratory care, blood counts, sepsis evaluations and antibiotic usage, age and days in cobedding. Data was analyzed using a student’s t test to compare the means of two matched cohorts of preterm twin infants by gestation. Results: The results suggest that cobedding of preterm twins is a safe practice from an infectious risk perspective. Conclusions: The increasing number of preterm twins coupled with the acuity and length of their hospitalization justifies the need to identify interventions specific to this population. Demonstrating that cobedding does not increase infectious risk for preterm infants is a necessary first step for further research on cobedding and its effects for infants and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncidence of infection for preterm twins cared for in cobedding in the NICUen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158308-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Incidence of infection for preterm twins cared for in cobedding in the NICU </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">LaMar, Kim</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Faculty</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Community Services Building, 200 East Curry Road, Tempe, AZ, 85287, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statement of the problem: The introduction of cobedding of twins in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has led to much controversy. Although twins only account for 2% of all births, the risk of low birthweight is seven times higher and low birthweight twins account for 12% of all infant deaths. In addition, the Reproductive Statistics Bureau reports the number of twin births has increased over the past fifteen years by 42%. Preterm twins are immunocompromised and at risk for sepsis related to poor skin integrity, decreased innate immunity, invasive lines and the hostile bacterial environment of the neonatal intensive care unit. Sepsis plays a significant role in neonatal morbidity and warrants a close examination of practices that may have a relationship between this vulnerable population and sepsis. Research design: This study was a retrospective descriptive design utilizing chart review to compare the infectious risk for preterm twins cared for in cobedding with preterm twins cared for in separate beds over a ten year period. This study was a precursor for a prospective design by the author that is ongoing at a university tertiary center. Sample: A convenience sample of preterm twin infants less than 35 weeks were studied. Names were obtained through a unit census book that records all admissions to the NICU from 1992 through 2001. Methods: The setting was a tertiary center in the United States. Twins were systematically matched into two cohorts, those who were cared for in cobedding and those cared for in separate beds, based on gestational age at birth. The outcome measure was the percentage of preterm twin infants developing an infection while in cobedding as compared to the preterm twin infants not in cobedding as evidenced by culture and/or radiograph results. Other measures will include length of stay, reasons for separation of twins, feeding patterns, respiratory care, blood counts, sepsis evaluations and antibiotic usage, age and days in cobedding. Data was analyzed using a student&rsquo;s t test to compare the means of two matched cohorts of preterm twin infants by gestation. Results: The results suggest that cobedding of preterm twins is a safe practice from an infectious risk perspective. Conclusions: The increasing number of preterm twins coupled with the acuity and length of their hospitalization justifies the need to identify interventions specific to this population. Demonstrating that cobedding does not increase infectious risk for preterm infants is a necessary first step for further research on cobedding and its effects for infants and their families. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:43:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:43:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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