2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158310
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Staff Nurse Perceptions of the Contributions of Students to Clinical Agencies
Abstract:
Staff Nurse Perceptions of the Contributions of Students to Clinical Agencies
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Matsumura, Geraldine
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:535 SWKT, 84602
Contact Telephone:801.422.4893
Co-Authors:Palmer, S.; Harmer, A. C.; Callister, L. C.
Acute care clinical placements for student nurses are becoming more competitive. Factors contributing to this include an increase in the number of placements being sought, higher acuity of patients, higher nurse/patient ratios, the increasing use of unlicensed assistive personnel, and the nursing shortage. Nursing service and education have historically assumed that agencies provide service by facilitating student placements. The benefits of having students in agencies are less well documented. The perceptions of staff nurses regarding the potential benefits of having students working beside them were recently explored (Grindel, et al, 2001). In this study, student nurses contributed to the personal and professional satisfaction of the staff. However, there was only a 4.8% return rate in this nation-wide survey. No other studies could be found in the literature documenting the perceptions of staff nurses about the benefits and challenges of working with student nurses. The conceptual foundation of this study focuses on the creation of work-force mentoring environments. Following human subjects approval, the 54 item survey, Nursing Students’ Contributions to Clinical Agencies (NSCCA), developed by Grindel and associates (2001) was completed by staff nurses working in acute care clinical agencies. The survey focuses on the effects undergraduate nursing students have on staff time, staff development, quality of care, personal satisfaction of the staff, and unit standards and practices. On the last item participants rated their overall perceptions of students’ contributions from -5 (extremely negative to +5 (extremely positive). An open-ended question was added to the survey allowing for additional comments regarding nurses experiences with the student nurses. 160 nurses participated in the study, including 50 maternal/newborn nurses, 50 adult medical/surgical nurses, 40 pediatric nurses, and 20 psychiatric nurses. The age range of the participants was 23-60 years, having one to 40 years experience in nursing with a mean of 23 years of clinical practice. Items which ranked the highest included “enhances the clinical setting as a learning environment”, “interacts with patients and families” and “assists with patient care.” The mean overall perception of students’ contribution was +3. Comments included, “The students who are well prepared and actively involved in patient care help with the workload.” Nurses noted the “younger students focus on gaining skills, whereas senior students are wonder and genuinely interest.” Future trends in nursing appear to indicate a continued shortage with a decrease in clinical sites. The creation of a positive learning environment and a nurturing environment for mentoring is of critical importance. On the basis of these findings, strategies were generated for students, educators, and clinical nurses to facilitate more effect collaboration between nursing service and nursing education.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStaff Nurse Perceptions of the Contributions of Students to Clinical Agenciesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158310-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Staff Nurse Perceptions of the Contributions of Students to Clinical Agencies </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Matsumura, Geraldine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">535 SWKT, 84602</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801.422.4893</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">geraldine_matsumura@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Palmer, S.; Harmer, A. C.; Callister, L. C. </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Acute care clinical placements for student nurses are becoming more competitive. Factors contributing to this include an increase in the number of placements being sought, higher acuity of patients, higher nurse/patient ratios, the increasing use of unlicensed assistive personnel, and the nursing shortage. Nursing service and education have historically assumed that agencies provide service by facilitating student placements. The benefits of having students in agencies are less well documented. The perceptions of staff nurses regarding the potential benefits of having students working beside them were recently explored (Grindel, et al, 2001). In this study, student nurses contributed to the personal and professional satisfaction of the staff. However, there was only a 4.8% return rate in this nation-wide survey. No other studies could be found in the literature documenting the perceptions of staff nurses about the benefits and challenges of working with student nurses. The conceptual foundation of this study focuses on the creation of work-force mentoring environments. Following human subjects approval, the 54 item survey, Nursing Students&rsquo; Contributions to Clinical Agencies (NSCCA), developed by Grindel and associates (2001) was completed by staff nurses working in acute care clinical agencies. The survey focuses on the effects undergraduate nursing students have on staff time, staff development, quality of care, personal satisfaction of the staff, and unit standards and practices. On the last item participants rated their overall perceptions of students&rsquo; contributions from -5 (extremely negative to +5 (extremely positive). An open-ended question was added to the survey allowing for additional comments regarding nurses experiences with the student nurses. 160 nurses participated in the study, including 50 maternal/newborn nurses, 50 adult medical/surgical nurses, 40 pediatric nurses, and 20 psychiatric nurses. The age range of the participants was 23-60 years, having one to 40 years experience in nursing with a mean of 23 years of clinical practice. Items which ranked the highest included &ldquo;enhances the clinical setting as a learning environment&rdquo;, &ldquo;interacts with patients and families&rdquo; and &ldquo;assists with patient care.&rdquo; The mean overall perception of students&rsquo; contribution was +3. Comments included, &ldquo;The students who are well prepared and actively involved in patient care help with the workload.&rdquo; Nurses noted the &ldquo;younger students focus on gaining skills, whereas senior students are wonder and genuinely interest.&rdquo; Future trends in nursing appear to indicate a continued shortage with a decrease in clinical sites. The creation of a positive learning environment and a nurturing environment for mentoring is of critical importance. On the basis of these findings, strategies were generated for students, educators, and clinical nurses to facilitate more effect collaboration between nursing service and nursing education.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:43:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:43:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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