Comparison of Written and Verbal Examinations in a Baccalaureate Medical-Surgical Nursing Course

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158313
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Written and Verbal Examinations in a Baccalaureate Medical-Surgical Nursing Course
Abstract:
Comparison of Written and Verbal Examinations in a Baccalaureate Medical-Surgical Nursing Course
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Rushton, Patricia
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University, College of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:564 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA
Contact Telephone:801.422.5375
Co-Authors:Eggett D.
Purpose of Study: The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the traditional objective written examination to verbal examinations used to evaluate students’ knowledge base in a basic medical-surgical nursing class. The study examined the effects of testing style on student learning. Test scores, student comments on the study evaluations, and NCLEX scores were compared. The study hypothesized that verbal examinations would result in a more effective study and learning, and higher examination scores than objective written examinations. Background and Significance: At a large private western university college of nursing, students have traditionally been evaluated for their comprehension of medical-surgical content with the traditional midterm/final objective written test consisting of multiple choice, matching, and true/false items. Continuing observation of this type of testing in one basic medical-surgical nursing course has demonstrated some benefits and difficulties. The instructor of this course embarked on a project to determine the value of a verbal examination, in comparison with the traditional objective written examination. Research Method: Over a 6 year period of time, students in a basic medical-surgical nursing class were given the traditional written objective test or a oral examination. The written examination was given either in a single final examination or in multiple midterm/one final test patterns. The oral examination was preceded by nine case scenarios (133 items) based on class learning objectives which the students were to study over 6 weeks. The traditional class didactic lecture over involved content was also presented during that six weeks. At the end of the six weeks, students chose one of the 133 items, which they were to answer in an oral presentation to the test monitor. Some students were given the oral final and the written final. Results: 1. Student comments demonstrated that students preferred the oral examination format. 2. Average student test grades demonstrated a higher test average with a combination of written and oral test formats. In order for testing to be the most important part of the evaluation process, tests must be worth more than 50% of the total evaluation value.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Written and Verbal Examinations in a Baccalaureate Medical-Surgical Nursing Courseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158313-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Written and Verbal Examinations in a Baccalaureate Medical-Surgical Nursing Course</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rushton, Patricia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">564 SWKT, Provo, UT, 84602, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">801.422.5375</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">patricia_rushton@byu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Eggett D.</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose of Study: The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the traditional objective written examination to verbal examinations used to evaluate students&rsquo; knowledge base in a basic medical-surgical nursing class. The study examined the effects of testing style on student learning. Test scores, student comments on the study evaluations, and NCLEX scores were compared. The study hypothesized that verbal examinations would result in a more effective study and learning, and higher examination scores than objective written examinations. Background and Significance: At a large private western university college of nursing, students have traditionally been evaluated for their comprehension of medical-surgical content with the traditional midterm/final objective written test consisting of multiple choice, matching, and true/false items. Continuing observation of this type of testing in one basic medical-surgical nursing course has demonstrated some benefits and difficulties. The instructor of this course embarked on a project to determine the value of a verbal examination, in comparison with the traditional objective written examination. Research Method: Over a 6 year period of time, students in a basic medical-surgical nursing class were given the traditional written objective test or a oral examination. The written examination was given either in a single final examination or in multiple midterm/one final test patterns. The oral examination was preceded by nine case scenarios (133 items) based on class learning objectives which the students were to study over 6 weeks. The traditional class didactic lecture over involved content was also presented during that six weeks. At the end of the six weeks, students chose one of the 133 items, which they were to answer in an oral presentation to the test monitor. Some students were given the oral final and the written final. Results: 1. Student comments demonstrated that students preferred the oral examination format. 2. Average student test grades demonstrated a higher test average with a combination of written and oral test formats. In order for testing to be the most important part of the evaluation process, tests must be worth more than 50% of the total evaluation value. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:43:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:43:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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