What do older adults at risk for acute myocardial infarction know about AMI symptoms?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158319
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What do older adults at risk for acute myocardial infarction know about AMI symptoms?
Abstract:
What do older adults at risk for acute myocardial infarction know about AMI symptoms?
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2003
Author:Tullmann, Dorothy
P.I. Institution Name:California State University-Bakersfield, Department of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:9001 Stockdale Highway, Bakersfield, CA, 93311-1099, USA
Contact Telephone:661.664.3114
Statement of the Problem: Half a million people die from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) each year and 85% of these deaths occur among those >/= 65 years. One cause of the disproportionate mortality among older adults is the problem of treatment-seeking delay. Reperfusion should occur within one hour form symptom onset of AMI victims. However, the median delay time for AMI victims is currently 2 to 6 ½ hours. Older adults delay even longer than younger individuals, drastically reducing the efficacy of treatment they receive. Decreased knowledge of AMI symptoms and many psychosocial factors have been associated with increased delay. Atypical symptoms are more common in older adults and may also be a factor in treatment-seeking delay. The purpose of this study was to discover what older adults at risk for AMI know about cardiovascular disease and AMI symptoms. Theoretical Framework: Leventhal’s Self-Regulatory Model provided the theoretical underpinnings for the study. Knowledge is conceptualized as necessary for an accurate cognitive appraisal of AMI symptoms. Cognitive appraisal is partially responsible for a person’s “action plan” i.e. pre-treatment day. Sample and Sampling: 115 participants with self-report of cardiovascular disease, >/= 65 years, and living independently were included. Exclusion criteria were: cognitive or physical limitations prohibiting active participation, non-English speaking, major, uncorrected hearing loss, and history of personalized AMI education. Participants were recruited from two hospitals and a senior center. Potential subjects were contacted by an introductory letter or announcement at a senior center. Initial contact was made by telephone to verify inclusion criteria and to set up an appointment for data collection. Methods: Design: Descriptive. Instruments: MMSE, Clinical History, Response Questionnaire. Procedure: After obtaining informed consent, the MMSE was administered followed by data collection. Data Analysis: Frequencies and percentages were calculated for each item of the Response Questionnaire. Research Findings: Almost all participants knew the most common symptoms of AMI (chest pain, chest pressure, chest tightness, shortness of breath, numbness/tingling of left arm/shoulder). Less the 75% of participants answered correctly on 13 of 26 items and less than 60% knew atypical symptoms of AMI (back pain, jaw pain, headache, abdominal pain, sense of doom, cough). Conclusions: Older adults at risk for AMI know the common symptoms of AMI. Patient education must address atypical symptoms and that atypical symptoms are more likely to occur in older adults. Further research is needed to discover effective interventions for increasing knowledge in this vulnerable population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat do older adults at risk for acute myocardial infarction know about AMI symptoms?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158319-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">What do older adults at risk for acute myocardial infarction know about AMI symptoms? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tullmann, Dorothy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University-Bakersfield, Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9001 Stockdale Highway, Bakersfield, CA, 93311-1099, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">661.664.3114</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dtullmann@csub.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Statement of the Problem: Half a million people die from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) each year and 85% of these deaths occur among those &gt;/= 65 years. One cause of the disproportionate mortality among older adults is the problem of treatment-seeking delay. Reperfusion should occur within one hour form symptom onset of AMI victims. However, the median delay time for AMI victims is currently 2 to 6 &frac12; hours. Older adults delay even longer than younger individuals, drastically reducing the efficacy of treatment they receive. Decreased knowledge of AMI symptoms and many psychosocial factors have been associated with increased delay. Atypical symptoms are more common in older adults and may also be a factor in treatment-seeking delay. The purpose of this study was to discover what older adults at risk for AMI know about cardiovascular disease and AMI symptoms. Theoretical Framework: Leventhal&rsquo;s Self-Regulatory Model provided the theoretical underpinnings for the study. Knowledge is conceptualized as necessary for an accurate cognitive appraisal of AMI symptoms. Cognitive appraisal is partially responsible for a person&rsquo;s &ldquo;action plan&rdquo; i.e. pre-treatment day. Sample and Sampling: 115 participants with self-report of cardiovascular disease, &gt;/= 65 years, and living independently were included. Exclusion criteria were: cognitive or physical limitations prohibiting active participation, non-English speaking, major, uncorrected hearing loss, and history of personalized AMI education. Participants were recruited from two hospitals and a senior center. Potential subjects were contacted by an introductory letter or announcement at a senior center. Initial contact was made by telephone to verify inclusion criteria and to set up an appointment for data collection. Methods: Design: Descriptive. Instruments: MMSE, Clinical History, Response Questionnaire. Procedure: After obtaining informed consent, the MMSE was administered followed by data collection. Data Analysis: Frequencies and percentages were calculated for each item of the Response Questionnaire. Research Findings: Almost all participants knew the most common symptoms of AMI (chest pain, chest pressure, chest tightness, shortness of breath, numbness/tingling of left arm/shoulder). Less the 75% of participants answered correctly on 13 of 26 items and less than 60% knew atypical symptoms of AMI (back pain, jaw pain, headache, abdominal pain, sense of doom, cough). Conclusions: Older adults at risk for AMI know the common symptoms of AMI. Patient education must address atypical symptoms and that atypical symptoms are more likely to occur in older adults. Further research is needed to discover effective interventions for increasing knowledge in this vulnerable population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:43:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:43:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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