2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158322
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploration of the use of Technology by Older Adults to Improve Exercise
Abstract:
Exploration of the use of Technology by Older Adults to Improve Exercise
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Belza, Basia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Title:Associate Professor Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems
Contact Address:, Seattle , WA
Co-Authors:JoAnne Whitney, PhD, RN, CWCN; Catherine Warms, PhD, ARNP, CRRN
Background: The long-term goal of this project is to reduce or delay arthritis-related pain and disability in inactive or inadequately active older adults through the adoption and maintenance of physical activity. Evidence exists that exercise is beneficial for symptom reduction in arthritis and yet adherence to prescribed activity regimens is poor. Technology may support behavior change and has potential applications in physical activity interventions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the use of technology by older adults to improve exercise adherence. To this end we: 1) determined feasibility and acceptability of a web-based program geared to older adults, and 2) proposed other technologies to improve adherence. Method. A convenience sample of 11 adults (ages 75-86) with arthritis was recruited from one retirement community. Participants attended two focus groups. During the first focus group questions were asked about activity level, reasons for being physically active and inactive, strategies to stay active, and characteristics of a web-based program that would be appealing. Participants were asked to comment on a beta test of a web-based program. In a second focus group the same participants were asked to confirm the findings from the first focus group and provide feedback about the use of other types of technology to improve exercise adherence. Specifically they were asked to comment on a delivery channel called Video Tracesâ. This “assisted technology” consists of digital video clips and annotation with talk or gestures provided by a teacher or expert. Findings: Findings from the first focus group suggest that participants were not interested in nor would using a web-based program. Participants were interested in doing an individualized program in their own living space using a personalized video of exercises to enable them to do exercises the right way. Therefore, we did not pursue the further development of a web-based program. Findings from the second focus group revealed that participants were interested in Video Tracesâ as a potential medium to assist them with various aspects of exercising, including receiving personalized instruction. Conclusions: Older adults are more enthusiastic about technology that looks and works like technology with which they are familiar. Participants’ interest was piqued with Video Tracesâ which appears and works more like a television and less like a computer. The roles and types of technology for promoting physical activity and enhancing adherence to exercise may be different for older than younger populations. Funded by the UW Center for Women’s Health Research NINR 2 P30 NR04001
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploration of the use of Technology by Older Adults to Improve Exerciseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158322-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploration of the use of Technology by Older Adults to Improve Exercise</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Belza, Basia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Seattle , WA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">JoAnne Whitney, PhD, RN, CWCN; Catherine Warms, PhD, ARNP, CRRN </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The long-term goal of this project is to reduce or delay arthritis-related pain and disability in inactive or inadequately active older adults through the adoption and maintenance of physical activity. Evidence exists that exercise is beneficial for symptom reduction in arthritis and yet adherence to prescribed activity regimens is poor. Technology may support behavior change and has potential applications in physical activity interventions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the use of technology by older adults to improve exercise adherence. To this end we: 1) determined feasibility and acceptability of a web-based program geared to older adults, and 2) proposed other technologies to improve adherence. Method. A convenience sample of 11 adults (ages 75-86) with arthritis was recruited from one retirement community. Participants attended two focus groups. During the first focus group questions were asked about activity level, reasons for being physically active and inactive, strategies to stay active, and characteristics of a web-based program that would be appealing. Participants were asked to comment on a beta test of a web-based program. In a second focus group the same participants were asked to confirm the findings from the first focus group and provide feedback about the use of other types of technology to improve exercise adherence. Specifically they were asked to comment on a delivery channel called Video Traces&acirc;. This &ldquo;assisted technology&rdquo; consists of digital video clips and annotation with talk or gestures provided by a teacher or expert. Findings: Findings from the first focus group suggest that participants were not interested in nor would using a web-based program. Participants were interested in doing an individualized program in their own living space using a personalized video of exercises to enable them to do exercises the right way. Therefore, we did not pursue the further development of a web-based program. Findings from the second focus group revealed that participants were interested in Video Traces&acirc; as a potential medium to assist them with various aspects of exercising, including receiving personalized instruction. Conclusions: Older adults are more enthusiastic about technology that looks and works like technology with which they are familiar. Participants&rsquo; interest was piqued with Video Traces&acirc; which appears and works more like a television and less like a computer. The roles and types of technology for promoting physical activity and enhancing adherence to exercise may be different for older than younger populations. Funded by the UW Center for Women&rsquo;s Health Research NINR 2 P30 NR04001 </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:43:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:43:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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