2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/158324
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Aging, Diabetes, and Cognitive Performance Among Older Japanese Americans
Abstract:
Aging, Diabetes, and Cognitive Performance Among Older Japanese Americans
Conference Sponsor:Western Institute of Nursing
Conference Year:2004
Author:Bond, Gail, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington
Contact Address:Psychosocial and Social Community Health, Seattle, WA
Co-Authors:Robert. Burr, M.S.E.E. Ph.D.; Amy. R. Borenstein, Ph.D.; Susan M. McCurry, Ph.D.; Madeline Murguia Rice Ph.D.; Eric B. Larson, MD M.P.H.
Background: Data have demonstrated that among adults, diabetics experience faster cognitive decline than non-diabetics because of inadequate glycemic control. However, the rate of decline among older minority diabetics is not well established. Objective: To investigate the association of diabetes on cognitive functioning in Japanese Americans living in King County, WA. Design: Longitudinal growth curve analysis controlling for age, gender, education, smoking, depression, body mass index, and hypertension was used to examine the rate of global cognitive decline comparing diabetics to non-diabetics over an 8-year follow-up period. Sample: The sample included 1,624 Japanese American community-dwelling adults age 65 and older who were cognitively intact (free of dementia) at baseline and participated in at least one follow-up examination. The sample of diabetics included in the analysis was based on physician diagnosis and self reported. Measurement: Global cognitive performance was measured using the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument ([CASI] 0-100 point scale) Results: Results showed no significant linear or quadratic trend between diabetics and non-diabetics over the 8-year follow-up period. There were no significant interactions. The rate of cognitive decline among diabetics (n=302) was -1.206 [95% CI: (-1.989; -0.423)] CASI units per year and for non-diabetics (n=1,352) the rate of decline was -0.724 [95% CI: (-1.006; -0.442)]. Conclusions: The results showed that the rate of change over time (slope) on global cognitive performance did not differ between diabetics and non-diabetics. One possible explanation for this lack of a difference might be that this group of older Japanese American diabetics practice healthier self-management behaviors (diet, exercise, medication management), resulting in better glycemic control, thereby reducing the risk for cognitive decline. The statistical insignificance could also be attributed to an underpowered analysis. A need for future research exists that would investigate the role of ethnicity and diabetes self-management behaviors on cognition over time. This work was supported by grant #AG-09769 from the National Institute on Aging
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Western Institute of Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAging, Diabetes, and Cognitive Performance Among Older Japanese Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/158324-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Aging, Diabetes, and Cognitive Performance Among Older Japanese Americans </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Western Institute of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bond, Gail, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Psychosocial and Social Community Health, Seattle, WA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Robert. Burr, M.S.E.E. Ph.D.; Amy. R. Borenstein, Ph.D.; Susan M. McCurry, Ph.D.; Madeline Murguia Rice Ph.D.; Eric B. Larson, MD M.P.H. </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Data have demonstrated that among adults, diabetics experience faster cognitive decline than non-diabetics because of inadequate glycemic control. However, the rate of decline among older minority diabetics is not well established. Objective: To investigate the association of diabetes on cognitive functioning in Japanese Americans living in King County, WA. Design: Longitudinal growth curve analysis controlling for age, gender, education, smoking, depression, body mass index, and hypertension was used to examine the rate of global cognitive decline comparing diabetics to non-diabetics over an 8-year follow-up period. Sample: The sample included 1,624 Japanese American community-dwelling adults age 65 and older who were cognitively intact (free of dementia) at baseline and participated in at least one follow-up examination. The sample of diabetics included in the analysis was based on physician diagnosis and self reported. Measurement: Global cognitive performance was measured using the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument ([CASI] 0-100 point scale) Results: Results showed no significant linear or quadratic trend between diabetics and non-diabetics over the 8-year follow-up period. There were no significant interactions. The rate of cognitive decline among diabetics (n=302) was -1.206 [95% CI: (-1.989; -0.423)] CASI units per year and for non-diabetics (n=1,352) the rate of decline was -0.724 [95% CI: (-1.006; -0.442)]. Conclusions: The results showed that the rate of change over time (slope) on global cognitive performance did not differ between diabetics and non-diabetics. One possible explanation for this lack of a difference might be that this group of older Japanese American diabetics practice healthier self-management behaviors (diet, exercise, medication management), resulting in better glycemic control, thereby reducing the risk for cognitive decline. The statistical insignificance could also be attributed to an underpowered analysis. A need for future research exists that would investigate the role of ethnicity and diabetes self-management behaviors on cognition over time. This work was supported by grant #AG-09769 from the National Institute on Aging </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T20:43:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T20:43:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipWestern Institute of Nursingen_GB
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